Giant dinosaur prompts Aussie PGA to move

Last updated 09:55 12/02/2013
Jeff the dinosaur
Getty Images
ERROAR: Signage and the presence of a giant robotic dinosaur on the Australian PGA course last year has prompted organisers to move the tournament.

Relevant offers

Golf

World golf No 1 Jason Day welcomes 'Big Three' challenge at Memorial Giant alligator roams around Florida golf course Another solid PGA Tour finish for Danny Lee in top-25 in Fort Worth Kiwi golfer Michael Hendry suffers disastrous final round at Japan's Mizuno Open Lee solid but off the pace in PGA tour event in Texas Lydia Ko continues to battle at LPGA event in Michigan Kiwi golfer Michael Hendry shoots to the lead in Japan after stunning third round Danny Lee bounces back in the second round to climb up leaderboard in Texas Lydia Ko struggles to make an impression at LPGA tournament in Michigan Daniel Pearce leads way for Kiwis on PGA Tour of China

The PGA of Australia will move the venue for its PGA Championship, which was overshadowed last year by a billionaire resort owner's decision to position a giant robotic dinosaur outside the clubhouse and post unusual signage around the course.

PGA of Australia chief executive Brian Thorburn announced Monday that the tournament would be moved away from the Sunshine Coast region, where it has been staged since 2000. The venue for the 2013 tournament has not been disclosed.

Thorburn said a "lack of flexibility of dates ... and signage matters" prompted golf's national governing body to seek alternatives to the resort owned by mining magnate Clive Palmer.

The contract with the resort had been in jeopardy since a 26-foot mechanical T-Rex nicknamed "Jeff" - placed between the ninth green and 10th tee - generated international headlines and plenty of jokes. Palmer agreed to turn off the movement sensors on the dinosaur so it didn't flip its tail or open its mouth for a menacing roar during the tournament.

He also put up more than 60 signs around the golf course to promote his business interests, which include his plan to build a replica of the Titanic. Some of those signs were in the landing areas on the fairways and forced organisers of the championship, which dates to 1905, to mark those areas "ground under repair" during the tournament.

Ad Feedback

- AP

Special offers
Opinion poll

If she is able to, when do you expect Lydia Ko to win her first major?

Next year, she's so close

She's still working towards it, within three years

It may be longer than we think, within five years

The expectation might be too much, maybe never

Vote Result

Related story: (See story)

Featured Promotions

Sponsored Content