Australia PGA ban anchored putting strokes

Last updated 13:48 11/07/2013
Adam Scott
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NO BIG DIFFERENCE: Masters champion Adam Scott says he will still use his long-putter but hold his top hand away from his body, instead of anchoring it.

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Adam Scott and Peter Senior will have to ditch their anchored putting strokes in Australian professional tournaments after 2015.

The PGA of Australia on Thursday confirmed it'll follow the US PGA Tour in implementing the ban on the controversial putting method brought in by the game's international rule makers from January 1, 2016.

Both Masters champion Scott and veteran Senior have reaped great success worldwide since adopting long putters and anchoring them to their chests - Senior has used it for about 25 years.

PGA of Australia chief executive Brian Thorburn said the decision to implement the ban would at least provide those using the method plenty of time to make the switch.

"The implementation of this rule will inevitably affect a number of our professionals who compete both at home and abroad, and it's important they now have clarity and time to adapt," said Thorburn.

"Throughout this process our greatest priority was to ensure consistency so that when our professionals, and of course visiting internationals, play in Australia they will be competing under the same conditions adopted across all the world's top tours."

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