Condition make Open a lottery - Schwartzel

MARTYN HERMAN
Last updated 07:14 20/07/2013

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Former US Masters champion Charl Schwartzel said the British Open had become a "lottery" today after he twice belted the ball 400 yards down Muirfield's oven-baked fairways.

The South African was pleased to play his second round early, before the sun dried the course even more, and carded a three-under-par 68 to put himself in the title frame for the weekend on 143, one over.

During Schwartzel's opening 75 he snapped an eight-iron in a fit of rage and while he was far more in control today playing alongside Lee Westwood and Sergio Garcia, he did not appear to enjoy the lighting fast conditions that have attracted plenty of sniping by the players.

"I don't like it when it starts becoming that much luck, because that's what it is," he told reporters before heading back to his hotel to watch the guys "explode" in the afternoon groupings.

"When it gets this crusty and you're working on balls bouncing, six-irons going 280 after bouncing at 210, how do you judge that?

"It becomes a bit of a lottery. You don't know what's going to happen and you need to be able to play in conditions like we played in this morning," said Schwartzel.

"That way you can still control your golf ball and quality shots get rewarded. But when it gets like this afternoon, you can hit good shots and are going to get all sorts of results - it's not that fair in my eyes."

At the par-four 15th, a hole measuring 448 yards, Schwartzel and Westwood put their tee shots in bunkers guarding the front of the green.

"I did it on the second green too," said the world number 14 who won at Augusta National in 2011. "At 15 I went into a bunker 380 yards away at speed. It's like hitting down a runway.

"It's only going to get harder for the weekend and there will be a couple of holes that are going to get very suspicious.

"At 15 they are rolling into the bunkers and 16 they're rolling off the greens. I'll be kissing the golf course if I win though."

Schwartzel's first-round show of temper was still doing the rounds online on Friday and the 28-year-old admitted it was not one of his proudest moments.

"It was just an instant thing. I didn't think what I was doing. I'm not really proud of it," he said.

"When you're playing under so much pressure, and you're expecting so much of yourself, it's a reaction that just comes. I've done it a few times in my career but never, ever broken a club that way.

"It just shows you how hard the ground is."

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- Reuters

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