Loud music ready to wash over expected booing of Brazil president at Olympics opening ceremony

Brazil's interim president Michel Temer will launch the Games on Saturday (NZ time).
ADRIANO MACHADO/REUTERS

Brazil's interim president Michel Temer will launch the Games on Saturday (NZ time).

Olympics organisers are reportedly preparing to counter expected booing at the opening ceremony with loud music.

Brazil's interim president Michel Temer will launch the Games on Saturday (NZ time) amid a backdrop of political turmoil and environmental and logistical controversies dogging the leadup to sport's greatest spectacle.

In Britain The Times reported that "Operation Stifle Boos" is intended by the Rio Olympic committee to thwart anticipated efforts by angry Brazilians to shout down Temer, who has been accused by Dilma Rousseff of orchestrating a coup to force her from the presidency. 

Fireworks explode above the Maracana stadium during the rehearsal of the opening ceremony of the Olympic Games.
GETTY IMAGES

Fireworks explode above the Maracana stadium during the rehearsal of the opening ceremony of the Olympic Games.

Rousseff, who was suspended in May over allegations that she had fiddled the books to mask a looming recession before narrowly winning the last general election, was the target of obscene heckling when she opened the football World Cup two years ago. She faces an impeachment trial, engineered largely by the Brazilian Democratic Movement Party under Temer.

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Media in Brazil have suggested the acting president had been advised to keep his speech as short as he could, possibly only 10 seconds.

The ceremony is tipped to last as long as four hours, featuring local music greats and Brazil supermodel Gisele Bundchen, whose controversial scene, in which she appeared to be mugged by a street child, has been dropped after outcry at a media preview.

The show will trace Brazilian history, from its indigenous peoples through the arrival of the Portuguese in the 16th century and into the modern day.

NINE TO NOON/Radio New Zealand

RNZ reporter Gael Woods live from Rio on the eve of the Olympic opening ceremony.

It will touch upon some unpalatable aspects of the country's past, organisers said, such as the arrival of millions of slaves from Africa.

All the estimated 10,000 athletes competing in Rio will be given a seed to be planted in an Olympic forest after the Games end, symbolising the vast Amazon jungle that has been ravaged by loggers in recent decades.

Rio residents were feeling little Olympics spirit, the Times reported.

 As the torch entered the host city riot police fired rubber bullets at close range into crowds who had gathered to protest against poor pay and failing social services.

At one of the protests police officers grappled with a man who dropped his trousers and danced around in leopard-print underpants with the words "Temer Out" painted on his buttocks. He had been one of the torch-bearers.

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Globo, the main Television broadcaster in Brazil, has announced that it will screen domestic football on Sunday afternoon instead of Olympic matches.

The Chinese men's basketball team were stranded as they tried to leave the city's airport when shooting broke out near the main road.

Three Swedish tourists were kidnapped at gunpoint on Thursday (NZ time) after they asked their Uber taxi driver to stop as they drove through a favela in Rio so that they could take photographs. Police were sent to the shanty town and they were found unharmed.

And a Russian diplomat has shot dead a mugger as Rio's violence continued to make an unwanted presence.

 - Stuff

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