Top boxing promoter undergoes sex change

Last updated 13:19 11/08/2014
Sydney Morning Herald

World heavyweight champion Lennox Lewis' promoter Frank Maloney has told a UK newspaper he's undergoing gender reassignment and now lives as a woman called Kellie.

Frank Maloney and Lennox Lewis
TOP PROMOTER: Frank Maloney sits with his boxer, heavyweight champion Lennox Lewis.

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Former boxing promoter Frank Maloney announced in a newspaper interview overnght that he is undergoing a sex change.

The 61-year-old Maloney, who guided Lennox Lewis to the world heavyweight title in the 1990s, told Britain's Sunday Mirror newspaper that he was now living as a woman under the name Kellie.

The twice-married Maloney ended his illustrious career last October and told the paper he had been undergoing hormone treatment for two years in preparation for a sex change operation.  

''I was born in the wrong body and I have always known I was a woman,'' Maloney was quoted as saying by the Mirror.

''I can't keep living in the shadows. That is why I am doing what I am today. Living with the burden any longer would have killed me.

''What was wrong at birth is now being medically corrected. I have a female brain. I knew I was different from the minute I could compare myself to other children. I wasn't in the right body. I was jealous of girls.''

Maloney said his boxing career helped bring in enough money to walk away from the sport and live a new life as a woman.

''It was something that I was determined to suppress and keep wrapped up because I didn't want to be seen different,'' Maloney said.

''(Boxing) took up all of my time. It gave me a complete focus. It was something I thought I had to be successful in because I thought if I failed in that, where do I go?''

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- AP

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