NZ Olympic medal target set for Rio 2016

SIMON PLUMB
Last updated 12:29 27/09/2012
NZ gold medalists
LAWRENCE SMITH/Fairfax NZ

BLING BLING: New Zealand's Olympic gold medalists (rear): Joseph Sullivan and Nathan Cohen (double sculls), Mahe Drysdale (single sculls), Eric Murray and Hamish Bond (pair), and (front), Polly Powrie (women's 470), Lisa Carrington (K1 200m) and Jo Aleh (women's 470). Shot put gold medalist Valerie Adams is absent.

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New Zealand will target one more medal from the next Olympic Games in Rio than the 13 secured at London 2012.

High Performance Sport New Zealand, the elite arm of Crown entity Sport New Zealand, has released its 2013-2020 strategic plan - detailing medal targets for the next two Summer Games.

After success in London, New Zealand's best Games in 24 years, the key message for the next Olympic cycle appears to be stability, targeting 14 medals from Rio 2016 before the Crown's expectation rises to 16 medals in 2020.

"We are targeting 14 or more medals in Rio in 2016, and 16 or more medals in 2020. Those are our official targets for the next two Olympic Games," said Alex Baumann, HPSNZ chief executive.

"All the work in the years building up to London came to fruition when New Zealand won 13 medals at the Olympic Games and 17 at the Paralympic Games.  These were outstanding results that the nation was rightly proud of," he says.

"But we need to refine how we operate if we are to continue building on this success and this strategy represents the next step in the evolution of the high performance system.

"HPSNZ's 2013-2020 Strategy describes our vision, sets new targets for the next two Olympic cycles, and outlines our long term aspiration for New Zealand to be recognised as having one of the world's leading high performance systems."

The strongest indicators for where those medals are expected to come from lay in HPSNZ's "priorities" for funding and support.

In December, national sport organisations will find out how big a slice of HPSNZ's $60 million elite sport kitty their code will be entitled to in 2013.

HPSNZ has today broken its priorities down into three elements: sports and athletes with Olympic medal potential, Paralympic medal potential and non-Olympic targeted sports that can win at world championship-level.

Other targets set are one or more medal from the 2014 Winter Olympics in Sochi and two or more in 2018, eight to 12 gold medals at the 2016 Paralympic Games and two or more medals from the 2014 Winter Paralympics.

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- Fairfax Media

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