Armstrong 'humiliated, lynched' - Contador

IAIN ROGERS
Last updated 09:30 25/10/2012
Alberto Contador and Lance Armstrong
Getty Images
BACKING LANCE: Alberto Contador (left), who returned from a two-year doping ban in August, says Lance Armstrong (right) has been 'humiliated and lynched' by those chasing doping accusations.

Relevant offers

Other Sports

Violence incidents not hurting NFL's TV ratings MLB playoffs race to World Series wide open NFL: Oakland Raiders fire coach Dennis Allen Jonathan Dwyer charged over domestic abuse Fresh findings in 2012 NFL murder-suicide case Regional rivals could decide World Series winner Peter Burling takes helm of Team New Zealand Quiz: Sports knowledge test - September 30 Roulston to get back on track for Rio Games Cyclist Kergozou hopes tour work has pay off

Spaniard Alberto Contador expressed support today for disgraced cyclist Lance Armstrong saying the American was being "humiliated and lynched" by doping accusations which have led to the stripping of his seven Tour de France titles.

"It seems to me that at certain times and in certain places Lance is not being treated with any respect," Contador, a double Tour champion who returned from a two-year doping ban in August, told reporters in Paris at the presentation of the 2013 edition of the race.

"He is being humiliated and lynched, in my opinion. He is being destroyed," the Saxo Bank-Tinkoff rider, who had a difficult relationship with Armstrong when they were team mates at Astana, was quoted as saying by Spanish media.

"Right now people are talking about Lance but there has not been any new test or anything," Contador added. "It's based exclusively on witness statements that could have existed in 2005.

"I respect each rider's decision but I would have liked it to happen a bit earlier."

Armstrong was stripped of his 1999-2005 Tour victories on Monday when the International Cycling Union (UCI) ratified the US Anti-Doping Agency's decision to erase his results from August, 1998.

Armstrong, who fought back from cancer to dominate the sport, has always denied doping and says he has never failed a drugs test.

"What there is (in terms of evidence) I don't know, what I do know is that if cycling is popular in the United States it's thanks to him," Contador said.

"If they know over there what the Tour is it's thanks to him, if there are top-level teams and races in his country it's thanks to him."

Contador said the current testing was regime was adequate as a means of preventing illegal doping, Contador said.

"There is little that needs to be changed at the moment. The tests we have are as rigorous as possible, we have to be able to be located at all times," he said.

"There will be people who will have doubts, given everything that has come out, and I understand it.

"I say to them that they should believe completely that riders win races without help, also on the Tour."

Ad Feedback

- Reuters

Special offers
Opinion poll

Who would you most like to come to your aid after a road accident?

Mike Tyson - boxing

Lewis Hamilton - motorsport

Maria Sharapova - tennis

Valerie Adams - shot put

The Undertaker - WWE

Lindsey Vonn - skiing

Ana Ivanovic - tennis

Steven Adams - basketball

Rory McIlroy - golf

Vote Result

Related story: (See story)

Featured Promotions

Sponsored Content