Coe elected unopposed as BOA chairman

JOHN MEHAFFEY
Last updated 07:40 08/11/2012

Relevant offers

Other Sports

Phil Walsh: Adelaide Crows coach spoke of reconnecting with son months before death New Zealand cyclist Greg Henderson primed for his fourth Tour de France Black Sox confident about playoff chances at world softball championships in Canada Jo Aleh and Polly Powrie have gold 'in the bag' at Women's 470 Championship 12,000 people to carry Olympic torch in Brazil AFL honours late Adelaide Crows coach Phil Walsh at MCG Four players banned after mass brawl at world softball championship in Canada Angie Petty goes under Olympics qualifying time and dedicates it to grandmother New Zealand rifle shooter Ryan Taylor sets qualifying marks for Rio Olympic Games Adelaide Crows' AFL game against Geelong cancelled after coach Phil Walsh's death

Twice Olympic 1500m champion Sebastian Coe has been elected unopposed as chairman of the British Olympic Association (BOA) after masterminding the highly successful 2012 London Games.

Coe, 56, played a key role in bringing the Games to London for the third time and was then the driving force behind its success as chairman of the organising committee.

This year he also declared his interest in taking over from Lamine Diack as the president of the International Association of Athletics Federations (IAAF) when the former Senegalese long jumper stands down in 2015.

The top job in the major federation of the summer Olympics brings with it automatic membership of the International Olympic Committee, the most important body in world sport.

Coe, who will serve a four-year term as BOA chairman, was formally elected after British hockey chief Richard Leman stepped aside last month.

"I do consider this a huge honour because this is an organisation that defined a large part of my adult life," he told a news conference at the BOA's headquarters in central London.

"You cannot join an organisation like the British Olympic Association without recognising the extraordinary history. The history of the BOA is the history of British sport.

"It is a large part of the history of the Olympic movement. In 1908 and 1948 we didn't just deliver a Games but set a tone and a style for the movement for many decades to come."

Coe reaffirmed the BOA's hardline approach to doping, which took a blow this year when the Court of Arbitration for Sport overturned its lifetime Olympic ban for drug offenders.

"My stance is still non-negotiable and this organisation is quite right to believe that it is in the power of the organisation to decide what is best for that organisation," he said.

"You know from everything I have done that I will chair an organisation which will take a zero tolerance approach to drugs in sport. We have to recognise that we are in a much more complex and complicated world than we were 30 years ago."

Ad Feedback

- Reuters

Special offers
Opinion poll

Will Shane Cameron beat Kali Meehan on Saturday?

For sure. Cameron will knock him out.

It will be close but I think Cameron on points.

Meehan will knock him out. This is his last fight.

I'm tipping Meehan to win on points.

Vote Result

Featured Promotions

Sponsored Content