Cycling considers opening doping hotline

Last updated 08:02 14/11/2012

Relevant offers

Other Sports

Cleared Paula Radcliffe feels damaged by doping claims Eric Murray's desperate dash in rental car gets him to awards ceremony on time Wladimir Klitschko out to silence Tyson Fury, prolong heavyweight reign Kiwi yachties Murdoch and Junior climb standings on day four of Finn Gold Cup Zoe McBride's golden year continues after winning Nelson Sportsperson of the Year Paul Girdler skips NZ to Asia Pacific triples final on the day of his 200th game Auckland United softball still searching for premier club facilities Kiwi star Mike Dawson says canoe slalom for Rio Olympics "keeps coming at you" Man-handled by Murdoch, trackside with Snell - NZ sportswriter Norman Harris dies Boxer Pelea Fruean ready to follow in Joseph Parker's footsteps

Cycling's governing body is considering opening a hotline for riders wishing to discuss doping-related issues, International Cycling Union (UCI) president Pat McQuaid has said.

The UCI stripped Lance Armstrong of his seven Tour de France titles last month after the United States Anti-Doping Agency (USADA) said he was involved in the "most sophisticated, professionalised and successful doping programme that sport has ever seen".

Cycling has long battled a widespread doping problem and the UCI has been criticised from several quarters over its actions to combat the scourge.

"At the end of the day it is you the riders who have the ultimate say about whether our sport is clean," McQuaid wrote in a letter to riders published on the UCI website on Tuesday.

"Naturally, we need to do more to ensure that the UCI is as accessible as possible, and in particular to you the riders, should you wish to discuss issues or concerns relating to doping," he added.

"That is why, during the coming weeks ... the UCI will be looking into establishing a new open line - a confidential 'hotline'."

The UCI has set up an an independent commission to address any allegations of wrongdoing by the governing body during the career of Armstrong, arguably the most famous ex-rider in the sport's history.

"I know that it will take some time to build trust and confidence in this new line of communication, but I am confident that ... we can build that trust," McQuaid added.

"And by doing so, we will accelerate the change in culture that we need in our sport."

McQuaid also assured that the UCI, which has been accused of not following up some reported doping cases, "did act on information provided in the past and it will always do so in the future, within the bounds of what is legally feasible".

Ad Feedback

- Reuters

Special offers
Opinion poll

Will Shane Cameron beat Kali Meehan on Saturday?

For sure. Cameron will knock him out.

It will be close but I think Cameron on points.

Meehan will knock him out. This is his last fight.

I'm tipping Meehan to win on points.

Vote Result

Featured Promotions

Sponsored Content