Olympic sailor escapes ban for betting on rival

Last updated 09:48 05/12/2012
Peter O'Leary
Getty Images
CLOSE CALL: Peter O'Leary and David Burrows of Ireland compete at the London Olympics.

Relevant offers

Other Sports

College footballer's 'sudden death' unnoticed Snedden embarks on exciting new challenge 'Rhino' van Velthooven ready to charge into Rio Olympic champion critical of 49er restructure NFL reeling from more domestic violence cases Nude-looking cycling uniforms 'unacceptable' Oscar Pistorius free to compete for South Africa Vikings reactive Peterson despite abuse charge Shoulder surgery looms for gritty Val Adams Quiz: Sports knowledge test - September 16

An Irish Olympic sailor received a warning from the IOC today for betting on a rival to win, escaping a suspension because of the "special circumstances" in the case.

The International Olympic Committee executive board ruled that Peter O'Leary violated betting rules when he placed two bets on Britain to win the men's Star event at the 2008 Beijing Games.

O'Leary allegedly placed bets worth 300 euros with an Irish bookmaker at odds of 12-1, collecting 3600 euros when Britain took the gold.

IOC rules bar athletes from betting on Olympic events.

The case only came to light during the London Olympics when someone informed the Olympic Council of Ireland by email of the bets.

After an investigation by its ethics commission, the IOC said there was no evidence of match-fixing and O'Leary had not been fully aware of the betting rules at the time.

O'Leary could have faced a suspension, but the IOC said a warning was sufficient because his activity had "no impact" on the result.

"No proof of any match-fixing of the competition was found," IOC spokesman Mark Adams said. "While the executive board views any breach of its betting rules as a serious matter, it considered the special circumstances of this case when taking this decision."

O'Leary and teammate Stephen Milne did not qualify for the medal race of the Star competition in Beijing, which was won by Britain's Iain Percy and Andrew Simpson.

O'Leary finished 10th in the Star at the London Games with David Burrows.

The IOC has led efforts in recent years to bring sports federations, law enforcement agencies, governments and the legal gambling operators together to coordinate and fund the fight against betting corruption.

Ad Feedback

- AP

Special offers
Opinion poll

Of these accolades, which would you like to win most?

Football's golden ball

Commonwealth Games gold

US Open tennis title

World Cup of Darts

Tour de France yellow jersey

British Open golf title

Vote Result

Featured Promotions

Sponsored Content