Armstrong whistleblower feels vindicated

SIMON DAY
Last updated 05:00 19/01/2013
Stephen Swart

VINDICATED: Stephen Swart.

Related Links

I'm over Armstrong says bitter Anderson Armstrong's 'all-American story' shattered Lance Armstrong's dope admission shocks, angers Wada president: Armstrong 'no credibility' Armstrong doped during all Tour victories Armstrong stripped of 2000 Olympic bronze 'I left it all on the table' - Lance Armstrong Cyclists fear fallout from Armstrong interview

Relevant offers

Other Sports

Kiwis go head to head on world stage in Cambridge vs Oxford boat race New Zealand bowlers off to a promising start at 2017 Youth World Championships Laura Erichsen selected for O'pen Bic sailing world championships Promising young pitcher Kyle Glogoski off to United States Peter Burling lost overboard as 'hairy moments' highlight Team New Zealand testing Sir Alex Ferguson's inspiring words to Hughie Fury for WBO title fight with Joseph Parker Close contests aplenty as big boats hit the water on the second day of the Maadi Cup Martial arts is family affair as father-son pair earn black belts together Black Sox veteran Brad Rona never gave up hope of making it back for his sixth world champs New Zealand Minigolf Federation starts first NZ Pro League

Stephen Swart, the former teammate of cyclist Lance Armstrong, who started the demise of the seven-times Tour de France champion's credibility, says he finally feels vindicated.

Yesterday, Armstrong admitted in an interview with Oprah Winfrey that he had used drugs during all his tour victories.

"People always said that: 'You started this, now you are vindicated'. But we never had specifically 'I did this' until today," Swart, now an Auckland builder, said yesterday.

"There is more satisfaction and being vindicated today than anytime prior."

Swart, a member of team Motorola, was the first former teammate to admit using performance enhancing drugs and the first to allege the use of erythropoietin (EPO), a banned red cell booster which improves endurance, in Armstrong's team during his tour victories.

He has no expectations that Armstrong will contact him and apologise.

"He's not going to contact me, what has he got to apologise about? I've already said what I've done. I've never said what he has done. I've said what we've done as a team," he said.

"But if he gave me a call I would be willing to listen to what he has to say."

After watching the 90-minute interview from his Coromandel holiday home, Swart believes many questions remain unanswered by Armstrong.

"He is looking for a bit of compassion along the way. But all of the facts are out there [as to] what he has done. As far of the rest of that goes, there are few blanks in his statements."

As for Armstrong's claim he hasn't used drugs since 2005, Swart says: "I'm a bit open minded about that. I think there is a bit more too it than that."

During the interview Armstrong admitted to being a bully to get what he wanted. Although never specifically told, Swart said the bullying extended to telling the team to take drugs.

"It did in a direct and indirect way. And if it wasn't through him, it was through management. You can apply the pressure by saying we have to perform," Swart said.

"We all know what the score is - it was just whether you were willing to cross the line."

Ad Feedback

- The Dominion Post

Comments

Special offers
Opinion poll

Will Shane Cameron beat Kali Meehan on Saturday?

For sure. Cameron will knock him out.

It will be close but I think Cameron on points.

Meehan will knock him out. This is his last fight.

I'm tipping Meehan to win on points.

Vote Result

Featured Promotions

Sponsored Content