Disgraced O'Grady asked to resign from AOC

Last updated 12:17 25/07/2013
Stuart O'Grady
Reuters
REPUTATION IN TATTERS: Stuart O'Grady of Australia cycles past Mont Saint-Michel during this year's Tour de France.

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The Australian Olympic Committee has called on cycling great Stuart O'Grady to immediately resign from its athletes' commission, saying he doesn't deserve the role after admitting to doping for the 1998 Tour de France.

The AOC secretary-general Craig Phillips on Thursday said he had contacted O'Grady by email asking for resignation.

"Members of our London Olympic Team who elected Stuart to the athletes' commission are entitled to be angry knowing they had supported an athlete who had cheated," AOC president John Coates said in a statement.

"Athletes' commission members are chosen for their qualities of integrity and leadership and by his admission Stuart does not deserve to be a member of that group."

O'Grady announced his retirement on Wednesday after riding a record-equalling 17th Tour amid speculation he would be named in a French parliamentary inquiry into the use of drugs in the sport.

According to the government report, released on Thursday, O'Grady returned a "suspicious" doping test at the 1998 Tour de France.

Shortly after, O'Grady admitted to using the banned blood booster erythropoietin (EPO) during the now infamous Tour.

"This was a shameful period for the sport of cycling which has been well documented," Coates said.

"That is no excuse for the decision taken by Stuart O'Grady, and one can only hope that cycling and especially the Tour de France is cleaner as a result of today's revelations and the Lance Armstrong saga".

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