Hughie Fury denies taking steroids as world heavyweight title fight with Joseph Parker looms

Hughie Fury is bemused by the doping allegations hanging over him.
REUTERS

Hughie Fury is bemused by the doping allegations hanging over him.

British heavyweight boxer Hughie Fury has strongly denied taking drugs as an anti-doping inquiry casts a shadow over his WBO title fight with Joseph Parker.

A British anit-doping panel hearing into allegations of the use of banned steroid nandrolone has been delayed to allow Fury to fight Parker in Auckland on May 6.

Fury and his former world champion cousin Tyson were suspended over the 2015 allegations but had those bans lifted on appeal and now face a second hearing.

Hughie Fury shows his long reach during his last fight, a win against American Fred Kassi.
REUTERS

Hughie Fury shows his long reach during his last fight, a win against American Fred Kassi.

"I have never taken a drug in my life," Hughie Fury tolds The Times on Tuesday (NZ time).

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"It's someone playing games, trying to shoot our name down. I'm getting it because people don't like us there."

Fury said he had also been a target of social media accusations and abuse around alleged steroid abuse because of his long battle with acne.

"They were saying I'd been on steroids since I was 15," he said, adding that it only hardened his resolve.

"In our family we have problems after problems and have been through all sorts of things. We are very determined. Never give up on your dreams."

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A world title shot is a realisation of Hughie's dream as he looks to cap off the promise of a world youth title and an unbeaten 20-fight professional career.

But he also sees the Auckland fight as a chance to emerge from the XXL shadow of his infamous cousin. The WBO belt Parekr now owns is one which Tyson Fury vacated last year when his alarming personal problems emerged.

"Everyone has judged Tyson but I don't want people to judge me in the same light," Hughie Fury told The Times.

"I'm a different character, a different person. I believe people should respect my rights and not judge me by someone else's problems.

"Tyson is a big kid. He doesn't mean what he says. He shouts his mouth off and talks the talk. People like him for that and some people hate him. No one has ever seen the other side of Tyson. He is kind hearted. If he sees someone homeless on the street he will give them money. I know he disrespects the whole world but he thinks he has to do that. If he was himself and showed what he was genuinely like then he would have the whole world behind him."

Hughie backed up indications from Tyson that the former ruler of the division was ready to make his way back. Tyson Fury suggested last week he could return to action on May 13.

"He is getting his head down and should be back late this year or next year," Hughie said.

"Everything messed his head in and hopefully he is getting his head back. I think he is. It was a shame what happened. He beat the best. The dream is to be champions of the heavyweight division like the Klitschkos. I believe that will happen."

 - Stuff

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