All Blacks legend Dan Carter sees no problems with his corticoids injection

Dan Carter: "I can't see a problem with that because that's all within the regulations. When you have an injury, you get ...
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Dan Carter: "I can't see a problem with that because that's all within the regulations. When you have an injury, you get your injury cured."

Dan Carter, who has been cleared by the French rugby federation (FFR) of any doping wrongdoing after the French championship final, believes there is nothing wrong with getting an injection of corticoids to treat an injury.

Tests on All Blacks Carter and Joe Rokocoko, as well as their Racing Metro team mate Juan Imhoff, after the Top 14 final they won against Toulon in June, showed the players had tested positive for corticoids, typically used to treat inflammation or joint pain.

"The reason for me taking, which I explained to the medical hearing that we had, was that I played the semifinal against Clermont," Carter told French newspaper Le Monde on Wednesday (Thursday NZ Time).

"The next day I had inflammation in my knee. I had the injection. I rested for two days. And then after that rest I was fit to play and I played.

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* Carter, Rokocoko cleared for banned substance

 

"And I can't see a problem with that because that's all within the regulations. When you have an injury, you get your injury cured."

The FFR opened a disciplinary case against the club last week after Racing denied they had breached anti-doping rules and the players were cleared by the body's medical committee on Tuesday (Wednesday NZT).

Carter argued that he had tried other treatments before receiving his injection.

"I tried ... there's things to help reduce inflammation like icing and things. But you know, when there's something available to use that's not outside the anti-doping regulations, then I think it would be silly not to use that," he said.

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It was not the first time Carter had a corticoids injection as he revealed he received one during the 2015 Rugby World Cup.

"I had an injection after the injury, during the World Cup. I had an injury in the quarterfinals and the next day I had an inflammation in the right knee as well," he said.

"I've had a few [in his career]. When you have an injury, you want to cure the injury. It's as simple as that."

 - Reuters

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