Garlic used in fighting Murrayfield field parasites

Last updated 08:17 14/01/2014

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Besides warding off vampires, garlic also seems to cure rugby pitches of parasitic infection.

Groundstaff at Murrayfield, the home of Scottish rugby, have been working since September to eradicate the problem of naturally occurring roundworms that have been ravaging one of the world's best playing surfaces.

That has included spraying garlic on the affected areas as well as plant sugars to stimulate growth.

Scottish Rugby says the problem is ''manageable'' and the treatment is ''beginning to take effect,'' which should ensure Murrayfield can host Scotland's upcoming Six Nations matches against England on February 8 and France on March 8.

However, club side Edinburgh, which plays home games at Murrayfield, says it may have to move out of the venue temporarily to preserve the damaged turf.

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- AP

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