Garlic used in fighting Murrayfield field parasites

Last updated 08:17 14/01/2014

Relevant offers

International

South African union axes referees' chief Andre Watson Four nations in running to host 2023 Rugby World Cup Michael Cheika overlooks James O'Connor and Karmichael Hunt for Wallabies duties Black Ferns power past England at Women's Super Series in Canada Wallabies and Waratahs winger Israel Folau confirms Japan stint in off-season NSW Waratahs flyer Israel Folau signs three-year deal with Australian rugby Fiji hire Super Rugby coach to help Rugby World Cup campaign Daryl Gibson on Wallabies woe post Super Rugby semifinal routs Blues brothers Akira and Rieko Ioane among 10 new caps for Maori All Blacks Fourie Du Preez latest casualty as South Africa's injury list grows ahead of RWC

Besides warding off vampires, garlic also seems to cure rugby pitches of parasitic infection.

Groundstaff at Murrayfield, the home of Scottish rugby, have been working since September to eradicate the problem of naturally occurring roundworms that have been ravaging one of the world's best playing surfaces.

That has included spraying garlic on the affected areas as well as plant sugars to stimulate growth.

Scottish Rugby says the problem is ''manageable'' and the treatment is ''beginning to take effect,'' which should ensure Murrayfield can host Scotland's upcoming Six Nations matches against England on February 8 and France on March 8.

However, club side Edinburgh, which plays home games at Murrayfield, says it may have to move out of the venue temporarily to preserve the damaged turf.

Ad Feedback

- AP

Special offers
Opinion poll

Who was the better Springboks lock?

Bakkies Botha

Victor Matfield

Vote Result

Featured Promotions

Sponsored Content