Murray disliked Scottish independence stunt

Last updated 21:18 09/06/2014
Andy Murray
Reuters
NOT COOL: Wimbledon champion Andy Murray wasn't impressed by Scotland's nationalist leader Alex Salmond waving a Scottish flag when he won Wimbledon.

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British tennis star Andy Murray, a Scot who has so far refused to be drawn on his views about Scottish independence, said he disliked a stunt by nationalist leader Alex Salmond who waved the Scottish flag after Murray's Wimbledon victory last year.

Murray, who became the first Briton in 77 years to win the men's singles title at Wimbledon, was asked in an interview what he thought of Scotland's First Minister Salmond.

''He seemed nice perfectly nice to me, but I didn't like it when he got the Scottish flag up at Wimbledon,'' Murray, who was born in Scotland, told the Sunday Times Style magazine.

Salmond held up Scotland's blue and white flag, the Saltire, behind British Prime Minister David Cameron's head as the crowd celebrated Murray's historic Wimbledon victory last July.

''I started competing for Great Britain when I was 11. A lot of people forget that,'' said Murray, who is ranked as the world's No. 5 tennis player.

Murray has so far kept out of the debate on whether Scotland should leave the United Kingdom. Scots vote on Sept. 18 on whether to declare independence.

He told the Sunday Times that he didn't know who he would play for should the United Kingdom split.

Murray has tried not to air any political views after being slated before the 2006 World Cup when he said he'd support anyone but England, a remark he has said many times since was not serious.

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- Reuters

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