Murray demands his day out of the sun

Last updated 07:16 23/01/2013
Andy Murray
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HOT WORK: Andy Murray has not played a single night match yet during this Australian Open.

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Andy Murray might have thought breaking through for a grand slam win might change things, but the Scot and his coach Ivan Llendl are annoyed that he is still playing second fiddle to Roger Federer.

Murray and Lendl are angry that the Australian Open has scheduled Roger Federer's quarterfinal against Jo-Wilfried Tsonga at night - his fourth consecutive night match of the Open - while the third-seeded Scot will again toil away in the heat of the afternoon sun.

If Murray wins his quarterfinal against Frenchman Jeremy Chardy and meets Federer in the semi, Murray will not have played a single night match on Rod Laver Arena, while Federer will only have played then.

Lendl is understood to have made his feelings on the matter clear to Tournament Director Craig Tiley and tournament referee Wayne McKewen.

Lendl declined to comment on what he had said and the rest of the Murray entourage - assistant coach Dani Vallverdu, fitness trainer Jez Green, physio Andy Ireland and agent Matt Gentry - were all in the cone of silence.

Earlier in the tournament Murray said the difference in conditions between night and day made it feel "almost like playing in two separate tournaments".

"The balls tend to be less lively and the bounce off the court is much slower so it's very different, almost like playing in two separate tournaments," he said.

The host broadcaster has a say in the scheduling of matches and Federer playing charismatic former Australian Open finalist Jo-Wilfried Tsonga would be more compelling than Murray and the unseeded Chardy.

"The players know what goes in with scheduling, it isn't a simple matter. I think we do a pretty good job of being fair. TV only have a contributing voice," Tiley said.

Asked if Murray had been relatively poorly treated Tiley replied: "Only if you look through a narrow looking glass. But you have to look at all the variables, such as broadcast requests, the opponents they have had and Federer playing Bernard Tomic last Saturday."

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- Sydney Morning Herald

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