Top five reader comments of the day

Last updated 14:40 18/07/2014
Tim Tams
KIRK HARGREAVES/ Fairfax NZ

SWEET TEMPTATION: Is it right or wrong to eat a chocolate biscuit?

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Today's best comments on the topics of warfare, tasty treats, building materials, sportsmanship and ball dates provide us with lessons in morality, of varying degrees.

Yes, even building materials can offer lessons in morality.

So, without further ado, here are today's top five comments.

5. This comment from Foster on the topic of food guilt discusses the nirvana of mindful eating:

"'The truth is, food is just a substance, it is neither good nor bad - that's an unhelpful judgement.'

This might be true, from a moral standpoint - and I fully understand the thrust of this article, and the need to leave guilt-based motivation behind.

However, it's also fair to say that 'as many, or as few, biscuits as you like' is only sound advice if one achieves the nirvana of mindful eating.

Biscuits like Toffee Pops and Tim Tams are deliberately formulated to push lots of reward buttons in your brain, for very, very little in nutritional return.

Food might not be 'good' or 'bad' morally, but some foods are better for us than others, and there's no point kidding ourselves.

What really works is to eat a healthy balanced diet, including a few treats here and there and definitely not feeling guilty for that.

On the other hand, if you binge on nutritionally void foodstuffs and then feel bad - there is a valid, biological reason for that, and in my view, it's best not to ignore it."

4. Shooting down a civilian airliner is a horrific event that poses more questions than it answers as smelanie reflects.

"It amazes me that there is a whole industry dedicated to creating weapons of warfare whose sole purpose is to obliterate as much as possible - then they call it 'defence'."

3. Sportsman are often accused of acting in an improper manner, but as Lose Unit notes, fans are often worse, wrongly vilifying superstars.

"IMO Nonu is one of the world's best inside centres playing international rugby at present, only de Villiers comes close followed by Wesley Fofana.

Opposition defences have to commit two or more defenders to shut him down which opens gaping holes for those outside him to exploit.

He's a menace to contain, I think people have their pre-determined Nonuvision blinders on when assessing his contributions; he had a cracker for the Blues this season despite the average to poor result for the franchise overall - again, not his fault."

2. Now the one you've all been waiting for: morals in building materials. Aswendyhay67 notes, the problem lies in quality control.

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"Today's materials are also very shoddy compared with 30-40 years ago.

'Wheatbix' cabinetry with a thin layer of plastic on top, crappy sealant around everything which goes mouldy and falls out very quickly, cheap diecast metal instead of solid steel for handles and other components, flimsy tapware that can't be mended with washers - throwaway instead.

Tthin 'glued on' carpet with a short life, 'gunk on junk' curtains, thinly panelled doors filled with dry foamy stuff which warp, faux metal finishes on many fittings which turn out to be plastic and break down quickly. And so on.

Most things in your house last as long as the builder’s one year warranty before needing to be replaced. (At your cost). The 7 year warranty does not cover them. The only improvements seem to be in insulation and double glazing."

1. But where morals really count is in relationships, and there's none more sacred than that between author and reader. Evoking questions of what's naughty and nice to say, here's how some_dude reflected on a Stuff Nation piece about holiday memories.

"I've come to the conclusion that this article has the same punchline as the one about the boy who goes to a school ball (or prom) and has to stand in a bunch of lines beforehand.

And I quote: 'A teenage boy is getting ready to take his girlfriend to the prom.

First he goes to rent a tux, but there's a long tux line at the shop and it takes forever.

Next, he has to get some flowers, so he heads over to the florist and there’s a huge flower line there. He waits forever but eventually gets the flowers.

Then he heads out to rent a limo. Unfortunately, there's a large limo line at the rental office, but he's patient and gets the job done.

Finally, the day of the prom comes. The two are dancing happily and his girlfriend is having a great time. When the song is over, she asks him to get her some punch, so he heads over to the punch table and gets some punch. There's no punchline.'"

- Stuff

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