READER REPORT:

Labour of love: Panic in the delivery room

KELLY ROSE
Last updated 05:00 25/02/2013
evie
CHEEKY: Evie gave her parents quite a fright after being born not breathing.

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A labour of love

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After three miscarriages, I found myself pregnant again in June 2011.

Around the six-week mark, I started bleeding. I was certain it was all over. But a scan showed that bubs was fine. 

I was exhausted and majorly sick. When the 12-week scan came I can't tell you the relief we felt.

The 20 week scan revealed a baby girl, but the sonographer looked concerned and excused herself from the room.

They could only see one kidney and there was a mass in her abdomen.

It was assumed that bubs was missing a kidney, and had a cyst in her abdomen. The cyst was likely to be either attached to an ovary, or be the undeveloped kidney. We weren't really going to know until after we had her.

Later we found out that bubs was breech, and that I would get a date and time as to when she was going to arrive.

My caesarean was booked for January 25, 2012. I cried as I walked in to the operating room. I freaked out. Tears were streaming down my face.

The freak out subsided as my knees went warm and fuzzy. I can only describe the procedure as someone tickling the inside of my tummy! No pain or anything.

And then Evie made her way in to the world.

They pulled her out and my husband leaned over to look at her. They lifted her up so I could see her.

I knew she wouldn't cry right away, as I had heard that a lot of c-section babies are a bit shocked and need a bit of oxygen. But there was no crying for quite some time. My husband was allowed to go over and see her, but neither of us were prepared for the emergency team to get called in.

I don't really know what went on as I was crying and couldn't see anything. From what I understand there was something stuck in her throat and she needed heart compressions and oxygen.

I knew it wasn't good. My husband was freaked out, so came to sit with me, but his expression of utter panic freaked me out and so the obstetrician sent him back to see bubs. It was only when Evie was about eight months old, that my husband told me that he heard someone say the word "dead" and that he involuntarily thinks about this every day.

Finally, I heard her cry.

She was wheeled to the NICU and I was wheeled to recovery. I sent my husband with her to make sure that she was ok.

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In the middle of the night, a nurse came in to help me express my colostrum, then I was wheeled down to the NICU to see her. We had a five minute cuddle, and then I had to go back to my room.

She was eventually brought in to me when she was about 24 hours old. 

At three weeks, she had to undergo surgery to remove a duplication cyst from her bowel.

Now at 12 months, we've just had checks on her bowel and the ectopic kidney, and she is medically perfect.

Medically perfect, and a cheeky little imp.


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