READER REPORT:

Addiction 'can ruin families'

NAME WITHHELD
Last updated 05:00 20/11/2013
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TIME TO QUIT?: Smoking costs large sums of money and smoking-related health issues are having a big toll on our health system.

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As I lay restless, engulfed by worry, I feared the worst. My mum had just been admitted to hospital for having a seizure.

For some time I had a feeling this day would come, as horrible as it may sound. The thing is, my mum was a heavy smoker and had smoked since I was 2-years-old.

She smoked a packet and a half a day.

For the three days she was in hospital, she did not smoke. I was so proud. I thought she had finally seen the dangers of smoking.

My emotions completely flipped when she admitted she had started smoking again. She blamed it on stress.

If she was stressed, why didn't she get a massage or do something else to relieve it?

I was so frustrated.

For as long as I can remember, I have constantly begged her to stop smoking. I would do everything to try convince her.

I broke her cigarettes up.

I showed her the difference between a healthy pair of lungs and a smoker's pair.

I even put things in the end of her cigarettes, so that when she lit them they would crackle a bit and then eventually die out.

The problem with addiction is that the person cannot see others' perspectives. They don't understand why people in their life want them to stop. That is why addiction can ruin families.

Addiction forms an important part of their daily life and it can become them.

After a few years, I could no longer see her for the person she was. I now picture her with the beloved cigarette box, smoking away.

"Just one more," she says.


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