READER REPORT:

Helping kids eat healthy: Grow your own veges

CAROLE HIRST
Last updated 05:00 24/02/2013
Flush of growth: The vegetable garden will be taking shape now.

GREEN FINGERS: Getting kids involved in the garden may help their appreciation for vegetables.

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I did not have a problem with my getting my child to eat vegetables. I believe it had a lot to do with the fact I grew my own, so he was, from a very young baby, out there watching, and a bit later, helping.

As a toddler in the supermarket trolley, rather than going to biscuits, he would break off bits of broccoli and eat it raw (I would always ask the staff to rinse for me first). He would wander though the vegetable patch pulling off and eating raw beans and snow peas.

When he was a little older, he would help by pulling off insects, gathering up snails, planting seedlings, and watering.

Even when he started school and got to a fussier stage, he never stopped, though he still preferred raw to lightly cooked, and all had to be separate, never in stir fries.

As a young teenager, he had his own plot and was ready to defend to the death his right to grow his own food, should the conspiracy theory that was making the rounds a few years back have any truth in it.

As a young adult, now living with his father, I am told he is still eating that rabbit food.

So I would suggest, try growing a few easy vegetables, and getting the children involved, even if you start with just a few pots of lettuce and silverbeet.

It tastes better when it's fresh and you helped produce it.


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