READER REPORT:

Euthanasia: Dying like our dogs

REBECCA BATTERSBY
Last updated 10:30 28/11/2013

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Your stance on euthanasia

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You love this soul, you know their smell, the sound of their footsteps, the love for you in their eyes.

This loved one has been there for you through thick and thin, loved you unconditionally and has been with you in your darkest moments.

Now, you stand by them in their final days, maybe months, when they're in pain. The pain relief doesn't stop the intense pain.

They're are distressed and you know they just want to go.

Thankfully you can ease their pain, you can save them from relentless suffering before they die.

You can do this because I am talking about your dog.

Your mother is not afforded this same luxury. Your mother, your father, your brother, your sister or even your children have to live out their final months of a terminal illness in pain, losing all the capabilities that have rendered them dependent on their family or nursing staff.

They have a terminal illness that will take them, that is certain, and they have no choice but to slowly, painfully and without dignity, die.

We need to unblock our ears, uncover our eyes and talk about the process of dying.

For some people it is not quick or painless and I believe these people should have the ability to apply to die sooner than they have to.

There needs to be a process whereby after a terminal illness has been diagnosed and all other treatment options have been exhausted that a sufferer can apply to an Euthanasia Board.

This board, consisting of psychiatrists and medical professionals, could assess that an individual had been diagnosed with a terminal illness, had exhausted all opportunities for a cure or at least all medical options to reduce discomfort, had been deemed of sound mind and had reached this decision without duress.

Only then, under careful supervision of trained professionals, could somebody be provided with the medication needed to take their own life quickly, without pain and be with loved ones as they took their last breath.

Something needs to change because right now your dog is afforded better medical care in its final journey in life than your mother would be under the same circumstances.


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