READER REPORT:

Does God help us win in sport?

DAVID LIM
Last updated 06:00 08/02/2013
Super Bowl 2013
Reuters

Baltimore Ravens inside linebacker Ray Lewis attributes his career success to God.

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We've seen plenty of athletes thank God for their success on the sporting field when the opportunity arises, whether they've been handed the microphone after a game or whether it's in an interview much later on.

Retiring Baltimore Ravens player, Ray Lewis, publicly credited God for his success not just in his team's Super Bowl win on Sunday. We have seen plenty of others credit God for giving them the strength to succeed.

Many NFL players are not shy to admit their faith in God including Drew Brees, Russell Wilson and the Manning brothers. South Africans Victor Matfield, Bryan Habana, AB de Villiers and Shaun Pollock have also openly spoken about their Christian faith.

Stoke's Jon Walters doesn't cross his heart and point to the sky for no good reason, the Irishman is also a born-again Christian.

Closer to home, we know very well about Michael Jones' commitment to his faith in not playing on Sundays. His ability on the rugby field was always attributed to God.

But does God really help us score a goal, a try, or help us to win a game? And what if both sides are equally stacked with God-fearing Christians or Allah-fearing Muslims or Buddhists?

Does God favour athletes who believe in God over those that don't? Isn't God supposed to be impartial?

It is an interesting question to ponder, especially in a country like New Zealand which has made itself clear that it wishes to be separate from religion wherever possible and where many people no longer see the relevance of a so-called God.

 

**NOTE: Comments have now been closed on this story.


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