READER REPORT:

Album I can't live without: Physical Graffiti

ANDREW JOHNSON
Last updated 05:00 14/12/2012
Physical Graffiti
WINDOW DISPLAY: Part of the famous album sleeve for Led Zeppelin's Physical Graffiti.

Related Links

An album full of Grace Album I couldn't live without: Take in The Sun Album I couldn't live without: Dangerous The album I couldn't live without: Live at Fillmore East Album I couldn't live without: We Are Not Alone Album I couldn't live without: Available Light Album I couldn't live without: Forever Changes The album I couldn't live without: The Fragile The album I can't live without: The River The album I couldn't love without: Blood Sugar Sex Magik

Relevant offers

The album I can't live without

Album I can't live without: Layla & Other Assorted Love Songs Album I can't live without: Avalon Album I can't live without: American Pie Album I can't live without: Thriller Album I can't live without: Beethoven Album I can't live without: My own Album I can't live without: Exodus Album I can't live without: Jagged Little Pill Album I can't live without: The Wall Album I can't live without: Born In The USA

The album that is a mainstay in my life is Led Zeppelin's Physical Graffiti.

It was released in 1975, when I was 10. At that time my music of choice was the latest Solid Gold Hits album. By 1978, however, through my older brother bringing home a tatty copy of Led Zep 3, my life changed forever. From those first blistering chords of Immigrant Song I was hooked.

I then set about collecting everything I could find on Zeppelin. The jewel in the catalogue surely has to be Physical Graffiti, as opposed to the multi-mega-selling Led Zep 4, which with Stairway to Heaven on it proceeded to sell like a No 1 single.

The thing that most attracts me to Physical Graffiti is the sheer diversity of the music within. Zeppelin had a wealth of material for the album and they also had some other great music left over from the four previous albums, which resulted in them releasing it as a double album.

From the building majesty of Kashmir, the jug band hoedown of Boogie with Stu, the Stevie Wonderish Trampled Underfoot, the otherworldliness of In the Light, the out and out stomper The Wanton Song, to the shimmering Ten Years Gone, this album had everything. It even had at that stage the most expensive album sleeve design with its interchangeable windows.

For me the album really shows that Zeppelin were far from being just another heavy rock band. Here was a band that wasn't short on imagination and could conjure up music which has yet to be surpassed. Witness to that, of course, is the reaction to their just-released Celebration Day DVD/CD, where they have proven yet again just how incredible an experience a live Zeppelin show can be.


View all contributions
Ad Feedback

Comments

Special offers

Featured Promotions

Sponsored Content