READER REPORT:

Album I can't live without: Exodus

KIERAN STEELE
Last updated 14:30 15/02/2013
marley
MASTERFUL: Bob Marley and The Wailers' album Exodus.

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I am inclined to agree with Time Magazine and it's conclusion that Bob Marley's Exodus is the greatest album of all time.

The album is a wonderful fusion of political comment, rebellion and masterful lyrics combined with the wonderfully distinctive reggae sound. Some tracks are fun, some are full of moralistic messages. Reggae may not be everyone's cup of tea, but few artists have dominated such a major genre.

I first heard the album in 2003 when was 19 and at university. It was during a musical awakening where I had realised just how awful dance/trance/house music really was. I wanted to listen to more music with substance and meaning. Exodus filled that void beautifully.

The album's background is interesting because Marley was forced to flee his beloved Jamaica for London after an attempt on his life. It was a politically motivated assassination attempt on Bob Marley who was embroiled in the poilitical discourse in Jamaica in the mid-1970s. A politician used a campaign slogan: "We know where we're going."

The marginalised Rastifarian perspective was displayed in the album title song where Marley uses the lyrics "Open your eyes and look within. Are you satisfied with the life you're living? We know where we're going, we know where we're from, we're leaving Babylon into our father's land. Exodus".

My personal favourite track from the album is the opener, 'Natural Mystic'. It's a dark, heavy song but is very well structured. I'm also very fond of 'The Heathen' which is another excellent protest song.


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