Show's over, but Womad organisers' work will continue for weeks

The race course is packed with campers attending Womad.
MATT RILKOFF/Fairfax NZ

The race course is packed with campers attending Womad.

Hours after the Womad fans headed home, Brooklands Park was still a hive of activity as a large crew begins the pack up.

On Monday, more than 50 people were still on site are dismantling the stages, while others are picking up rubbish and tidying away tents.

"Lots of people go 'the festival is over, you must be really pleased to get a bit of down time'," event director Emere Wano said on Monday.

Lord Echo finished off Womad on the Brooklands Stage on Sunday evening.
SIMON O'CONNOR/Fairfax NZ

Lord Echo finished off Womad on the Brooklands Stage on Sunday evening.

"The wheels don't stop for us."

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The park is closed and signs at the entrances warned it would remain so until 1am on March 24 while the event was packed down.

Parov Stelar drummer Willie Larsson Jr playsn on the Bowl Stage.
GRANT MATTHEW/Fairfax NZ

Parov Stelar drummer Willie Larsson Jr playsn on the Bowl Stage.

"It might be physically finished for what people see but for our team there's still a lot of hard yards to go," Wano said.

"It's still really busy for us and will be for the next two weeks, so maybe after that we'll have a bit of down time."

In the campsite at Pukekura Raceway, the area had been transformed throughout the morning from a sea of tents to a bare paddock, with yellowed patches of grass the only reminder of where the tents had sat over the weekend.

There was a large selection of food available, including hand made chocolates.
SIMON O'CONNOR/Fairfax NZ

There was a large selection of food available, including hand made chocolates.

The glamping teepees that had housed music fans for the weekend were also being stripped back down to the bare bones of bamboo poles.

Alessandra Keighley and Anne Dawson, of New Plymouth, were among the last to be packing up their tents.

While she had been to every Womad, Keighley said she had decided to give camping a try this year as the weather looked so good.

Inna Modja on the Gables Stage.
GRANT MATTHEW/Fairfax NZ

Inna Modja on the Gables Stage.

"Camping was so much better because I didn't have to worry about parking the car and running on anyone's schedules, you could just cruise," she said.

"The vibe in the camp was just so peaceful."

She said she was looking forward to the review of shower and toilet arrangements in the camp, as there had been some long waits.

"People were very good about it but clearly there was a need for more services," she said.

Taranaki Arts Festival Trust chief executive Suzanne Porter said they were aware of the problems at the toilets both at the campsite and inside the park.

She said the toilet unit that would normally be in place beside the Gables Stage had been decommissioned within the last year and they hadn't been able to find a replacement.

"But we will definitely be looking to increase the number of pans on site again," she said.

Planning was already underway for Womad 2018, which will be held over March 16 to 18.

"There's definitely discussions artistically of what might be on the cards," Porter said.

 - Stuff

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