ABs combinations the difference against Wales

TOBY ROBSON IN CARDIFF
Last updated 08:38 25/11/2012
Liam Messam
Getty Images
BRILLIANCE: Liam Messam's opening try was a masterful team display from the All Blacks.

Relevant offers

National

Robson: Hurricanes found pride and place during their special Super Rugby season Callum Gibbins hopes Ardie Savea's fit, but feels ready to start in Super Rugby final Pakistan's Yasir Shah claims three wickets to restrict hosts Sri Lanka to 153-4 at tea Sunny Ruby odds on for three-year-old trotting filly of the year after Addington win Four players banned after mass brawl at world softball championships in Canada Kiwis playmaker Kieran Foran signs new four-year contract with Parramatta Eels Aaron Taylor pays credit to Electronic Motion's owners after special win Former Hamilton junior Mark Hadley now has world No 1 mixed doubles ranking Phil Walsh: Adelaide Crows coach spoke of reconnecting with son months before death Southland Sharks coach Paul Henare wary of 'dangerous' Super City Rangers

OPINION: Aaron Cruden was the first receiver under the spotlight, but it was Owen Franks who highlighted the biggest difference between the All Blacks and Wales at Millennium Stadium.

Liam Messam's first half try will live long in the memory and fullback Israel Dagg will be credited with the incredible footwork that created it from his 22.

But it was Franks' appearance at pivot that had most significance.

The sequence of numbers that ended with Messam's canter in the corner read 9-3-8-12-13-6.

A few minutes later Wales' got their best chance of the match when centre Jonathan Davies beat Luke Romano and raced clear.

The movement broke down when big loose head Paul James found himself in the backline where, unlike Franks, he clumsily fumbled the ball forward.

All Blacks coach Steve Hansen clearly has a vision for 15-man rugby where numbers on backs do not restrict his players' skills.

It remains a work in progress though with sloppy ruck ball an on-going problem that again scuppered their ability to build pressure on attack.

Aaron Smith's service was sharp enough, but too often the ball was slow or bobbled from the contact area.

That's just one of the issues Hansen and his coaching staff will need to address after a messy 33-10 win over Wales, one which will unfortunately be remembered most for Andrew Hore's thuggish first half hit on lock Bradley Davies.

The physicality of this match was ferocious from both sides, but Hore overstepped the mark.

It provided a contrast to his captain Richie McCaw, who was judged man of the match.

As Davies was staggering off the All Blacks openside was running over to check on prop Paul James who was prone on a stretcher with a knee injury.

McCaw patted his opponent on the chest and shook his hand before returning to his team.

That was one of the positives for an All Blacks side that appeared to become frustrated by Wales' resistance.

Another was the play of wing Julian Savea and Dagg at fullback.

Savea's high ball technique remains a work in progress, too front on, but his running is something to behold and there were some nice touches of skill to boot.

He knocked a delicate kick in to the corner and somehow kept the ball alive for Messam's try, first with finger tip control, then by popping a one-handed pass to Cruden on the touch line.

Dagg was back to his irresistible best with ball in hand, strong in contract and elusive in space.

Cruden did a more than decent job of filling Dan Carter's shoes, banging over seven goals, but missed touch early and a tackle late in a test where the All Blacks faced a determined opponent.

Luke Romano was also a mixed bag, running a tad too high early on, but scoring a fine try running off a Savea surge.

Romano's would be the All Blacks last try of the night, but, like the first, highlighted their competitive advantage, a lock running off a wing, an element Wales did not possess.

Ad Feedback

- Stuff

Special offers

Featured Promotions

Sponsored Content