Substance, needles found in Pistorius' home

JON GAMBRELL AND GERALD IMRAY
Last updated 06:49 21/02/2013
Oscar Pistorius
SUBSTANCE SHOCK: A spokesperson for the the Paralympics says Oscar Pistorius was tested twice around the London Games and both came back clean.

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A substance found in Oscar Pistorius' bedroom was a "herbal remedy" and not banned, his defence lawyer said, after police claimed they discovered two boxes of testosterone and needles in the Olympic athlete's house.

Police Detective Warrant Officer Hilton Botha claimed in Pistorius' bail hearing in a South African court that testosterone was found in his bedroom. Pistorius has been charged with premeditated murder in the shooting death of girlfriend Reeva Steenkamp.

Botha said police made the discovery in the double-amputee runner and multiple Paralympic champion's upscale Pretoria house but offered no further details or explanation. State prosecutor Gerrie Nel also had to correct Botha when he initially called the substance "steroids."

Pistorius' lawyer, Barry Roux, said on questioning the detective - who has 16 years' experience as a detective and 24 years with the police - that it was not a banned substance and that police were trying to give the discovery a "negative connotation."

"It is an herbal remedy," Roux said. "It is not a steroid and it is not a banned substance."

Police "take every piece of evidence and try to extract the most possibly negative connotation and present it to the court," senior defence lawyer Roux said. The debate over the substance added another dramatic twist to a case that has already gripped the world's attention since Steenkamp's killing at Pistorius' home last Thursday.

It was not immediately clear what the substance was.

Prosecutor Nel also had to clarify that police were not saying that Pistorius was using the substance, only that it was discovered along with the needles in his bedroom.

Pistorius said in a written affidavit and read in court by Roux that he mistakenly killed model Steenkamp in the early hours of Valentine's Day when he fired shots into a locked toilet door thinking she was a dangerous intruder.

The prosecution claims Pistorius intended to kill the 29-year-old Steenkamp after they had a fight.

International Paralympic Committee spokesman Craig Spence said soon after the substance claims that Pistorius - the world's most famous disabled athlete - was drug tested twice in London last year by the IPC, on August 25 and September 8. Both test results were negative, Spence said.

The August 25 test was an out-of-competition test, and the September 8 one in-competition, a day before the end of the London Paralympics.

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- AP

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