How to send New Year's video greetings

Last updated 13:46, December 30 2013
JibJab New Year's greeting card
JibJab

JibJab New Year's greeting card

Here's a fun way to bring in the new year - send a video greeting to someone you know and/or love.

There are many ways to do it. If you don't mind ads, you can easily create an animated greeting from an e-card company. What if you want to make and share a video clip privately, one to one? Here are easy ways to do it:

- On Apple devices, it's simple to just record a greeting by opening the camera app and shooting a video clip. You can then text or e-mail it.

On Android devices, it's not as simple. You can try to send via e-mail if the clip is really short (video clips tend to be big files, and Gmail doesn't allow attachments over 25 MB), send it privately one to one via the Google Plus social network, if your friend is also signed up, or directly to the Google Drive cloud service. From there, you can send your friend a link to the video.

- The process couldn't be simpler using Snapchat, the hot 2013 app that lets you send photos and videos that then disappear quickly. The good news is it's drop dead simple to share them one to one. The bad news - they vanish and can't be viewed again.

- Vello is a new app for Apple devices that lets you shoot 6 second clips and share them directly with your Facebook friends. However, to view privately, the recipient needs to type in a code to watch it first. Forget about that. People don't like registrations or codes.

- Instagram. The world's most popular photo app has a new feature for private sharing. Shoot the video in the app, and then choose who you want to send it to. Beyond the iOS texting, this was the easiest, simplest way I found to send a greeting.

- Facebook, which owns Instagram, surprisingly doesn't offer a video greeting feature in Messenger, its widely used texting app. But did you know you could text photos and audio greetings of your voice? Let's hope Facebook adds video functionality to Messenger in 2014.

- You can't send direct video messages on Twitter either - wouldn't it be cool if you did?

Finally, what about live greetings?

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There are many more options, including Skype, Google Hangout, Apple FaceTime and the new Hangwith app, but the other person has to be in front of the phone (or computer or tablet) when you're calling.

On the e-card front, JibJab is a popular way to send cards that feature you - and a bouncy song in the background.

 - MCT