American study finds texting laws don't reduce crashes

Last updated 10:01 29/09/2010

Relevant offers

Digital Living

Kiwi Global Mode creator sells service to overseas ISP US regulator FCC approves new Net Neutrality rules 2degrees US majority owner adds to stake Talking heads skew 'net neutrality' debate Europol sweep disrupts hackers hijacking millions of PCs SIM card maker admits US/UK spies probably hacked its network Hardware failure downs Spark mobile network FBI says sixty different hacker groups linked to nation-states Charity-IT weekend hackathon overhauls nonprofit systems Apple adds diversity to its emojis

A new study says laws that ban texting while driving don't reduce wrecks and might actually increase risks.

The Insurance Institute for Highway Safety's claim research arm released its findings Tuesday in Kansas City.

The insurance industry group compiled data from California, Louisiana, Minnesota and Washington immediately before and after driver texting was banned.

The study found the number of crashes actually increased in three of those states after the bans were implemented.

Institute spokesman Russ Rader says the increase might be the result of drivers trying to keep phones out of view while texting.

Highway officials say enforcement of the bans is just starting.

Ad Feedback

- AP

Special offers

Featured Promotions

Sponsored Content