American study finds texting laws don't reduce crashes

Last updated 10:01 29/09/2010

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A new study says laws that ban texting while driving don't reduce wrecks and might actually increase risks.

The Insurance Institute for Highway Safety's claim research arm released its findings Tuesday in Kansas City.

The insurance industry group compiled data from California, Louisiana, Minnesota and Washington immediately before and after driver texting was banned.

The study found the number of crashes actually increased in three of those states after the bans were implemented.

Institute spokesman Russ Rader says the increase might be the result of drivers trying to keep phones out of view while texting.

Highway officials say enforcement of the bans is just starting.

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- AP

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