Law to fight internet piracy passed

Last updated 09:10 14/04/2011

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A bill that could see internet users have their access cut off if they repeatedly share copyright material has been passed by Parliament.

The Copyright (Infringing File Sharing) Amendment Bill, which aims to stamp out internet piracy, passed by 111 votes to 11 this morning.

It was supported by all parties except the Greens and independent MPs Chris Carter and Hone Harawira.

Fierce protest erupted last night as the Government used urgency to rush the bill through its final stages.

Opponents took to social media sites such as Twitter to revive the 2009 "blackout" protest that brought about the redrafting of the controversial illegal-file-sharing legislation.

The new law would allow copyright owners to ask for a six-month suspension of the internet accounts of those who repeatedly infringe by sharing protected material.

 

Click here to read the full Bill on the New Zealand legislation website.

- MARTIN KAY, ANDREA VANCE/Stuff and NZPA

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