Apple WWDC15: iOS 9 will make your iPhone smarter than ever

Apple's Craig Federighi explains iOS 9 at the World Wide Developers Conference in San Francisco.
Bloomberg

Apple's Craig Federighi explains iOS 9 at the World Wide Developers Conference in San Francisco.

Apple announced a plethora of updates to their iPhone, iPad and Mac software today, bringing new 'contextual' services and multitasking capabilities to their popular devices.

READ MORE: View Stuff's live coverage of WWDC15

CEO Tim Cook and software engineer Craig Federighi introduced the new features at Apple's WorldWide Developer Conference (WWDC) in San Fransisco. The conference focuses on software rather than hardware.

iOS 9 for the iPad and iPhone will be rolled out to the public for free in September or October, but developers can get their hands on a beta today. iOS 9 will run on devices as old as the iPhone 4S and iPad 2.

THE iPHONE GETS SMARTER


New 'intelligence' features were highlighted for the iPhone and iPad. These upgrades to both Siri and Search bring 'contextual' information into the mix, allowing the device to guess at what users are after.

For example: a user could say "remind me about this" after receiving an email with an invitation, creating a reminder from information in the email. 

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The Weeknd performs during the Apple World Wide Developers Conference in San Francisco.

Attendees eat lunch after the keynote speech during the Apple World Wide Developers Conference in San Francisco.

Apple CEO Tim Cook poses with scholarship winners following his keynote address at the Worldwide Developers Conference in San Francisco.

Eddy Cue unveils the price of Apple Music at WWDC in San Francisco.

Drake addresses the Apple World Wide Developers Conference in San Francisco.

Drake on stage at the Apple World Wide Developers Conference in San Francisco.

Apple's senior vice president of Internet Software and Services Eddy Cue explains Beats 1.

Co-founder of Beats Electronics Jimmy Iovine introduces Beats 1 for Apple Music, the company's new subscription music streaming service, at WWDC.

Jimmy Iovine announces Apple Music during WWDC in San Francisco, California.

Beats Electronics founder Jimmy Iovine announces Apple Music during WWDC in San Francisco, California.

Apple CEO Tim Cook welcomes Jimmy Iovine to the stage at WWDC.

Craig Federighi shows off iOS 9 during the Apple World Wide Developers Conference in San Francisco.

Craig Federighi talks about iOS 9 at the Apple World Wide Developers Conference.

Apple vice president of product marketing Susan Prescott talks about the company's new news app at WWDC in San Francisco.

Attendees watch a presentation during the Apple World Wide Developers Conference in San Francisco.

Craig Federighi's address at the Apple World Wide Developers Conference in San Francisco.

Apple senior vice president of Software Engineering Craig Federighi speaks about iOS 9 during WWDC.

Apple Store VP Jennifer Bailey, speaks about Apple Pay during WWDC.

Apple Store vice president Jennifer Bailey speaks during the Apple World Wide Developers Conference.

Senior vice president of Software Engineering Craig Federighi explains some of Apple's newest apps at the World Wide Developers Conference.

Apple senior vice president of Software Engineering, Craig Federighi, shakes hands with Tim Cook during WWDC15.

Senior vice president of Software Engineering Craig Federighi explains some of Apple's newest apps at the World Wide Developers Conference.

Apple senior vice president for software engineering Craig Federighi speaks at the Worldwide Developers Conference in San Francisco.

Apple senior vice president for software engineering Craig Federighi at the Worldwide Developers Conference.

Apple CEO Tim Cook Holds up a baseball as he delivers the keynote address during WWDC in San Francisco.

Apple CEO Tim Cook takes to the main stage at the World Wide Developers Conference.

Attendees line up to enter the Moscone Center before the start of the Apple World Wide Developers Conference.

Apple CEO Tim Cook speaks with Ron Conway, founder of SV Angel, and Eddy Cue, senior vice president of Internet Software and Services, before the start of the World Wide Developers Conference.

Aattendees line up to enter the Moscone Center before the start of the Apple World Wide Developers Conference in San Francisco.

Outside the Moscone Center before the start of the Apple World Wide Developers Conference in San Francisco.

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Upgrades to Siri are paired with upgrades to 'Spotlight', the search app built in to iOS. Spotlight will now allow 'deep linking' for apps, meaning users can search for things within apps rather than simply apps themselves.

Intelligence also means that the iPhone is now more proactive, giving a user what they want before they have a chance to ask for it. For example, bringing up the 'now playing' screen when headphones are plugged in. This also allows for context-specific reminders, so a user could ask to be reminded of something when they arrived at work, or got into their car.

These features are not dissimilar to rival system, Google Now On Tap. Whilst Google's service uses the internet and the vast amount of information it keeps on users, Apple's service will live on each user's iPhone or iPad. When it does use the internet, it will collect the data anonymously.



A look at the iPad Mini's new split screen feature.

The default 'Notes' app is beefed up in iOS 9, with checklists and doodle support added.

THE iPAD, BUT FOR WORK

iOS 9 will also bring much greater multitasking capability to the iPad, allowing users to view and interact with two apps at once. As well as a traditional side by side view, the feature will allow 'picture in picture' mode, so one can keep a video playing in the lower right corner of the screen, and 'slide over', allowing users to quickly check an app without closing another one.

The split screening will only be available on Apple's newest iPad, the Air 2, while picture-in-picture and 'slide over' will be coming to the iPad Air and iPad Mini 2 and up.

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iOS 9 also allows the iPad keyboard to function as a type of trackpad, letting users scroll and use a cursor as if on a laptop. It seems Apple are serious about attracting the business market on their less popular product lines.

MUSIC

Apple's default music app has been completely redesigned and packed with new features as part of their 'Apple Music' launch.

This update will reach the iPhone in iOS 8.4, long before iOS 9 hits later this year. The app will feature a 24/7 worldwide radio station, featuring Kiwi DJ Zane Lowe, and a new Spotify-like streaming library available for US$9.99 (NZ$14) a month. Pricing and details for New Zealand are not available yet, but a free three-month preview of the service is set to launch on June 30 "worldwide". 

THINGS NEW ZEALAND WON'T GET

iOS 9 also comes with updates to several services not currently available to New Zealanders.

Apple's Maps app gained a 'Transit' feature for public transport available in the United States, the United Kingdom, and Australia.

An update to 'Apple Pay' was announced, allowing it to be used in the United Kingdom and in fusion with 'Square'.

No dates for a New Zealand launch for any of these features or the Apple Watch has been set.

Henry Cooke travelled to San Francisco courtesy of Apple.

 - Stuff

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