No word on Officemail fault compensation

TOM PULLAR-STRECKER
Last updated 16:47 09/11/2012

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Telecom is declining to say whether it is offering compensation to customers who were affected by problems with its Officemail email service last week.

Firms faced delays of several days receiving email late last week, with some claiming their businesses had been severely disrupted.

Telecom spokeswoman Jo Jalfon said it continued to "liaise with those impacted on an individual basis".

However, she would not clarify whether that meant Telecom was offering compensation to Officemail users that approached it seeking redress.

"Officemail is used by both business and residential customers and the impact of the problem varied greatly between the two - hence our commitment to address customer concerns on an individual basis," she said.

Telecom told Fairfax Media that "several thousand" individual email users were affected. Radio New Zealand later reported the number at 20,000.

Telecom Retail head Chris Quin, who was in India when the problems arose, today wrote to Officemail users to apologise for the disruption.

He said Telecom was urgently reviewing Officemail's technology platform and putting in place "system changes" to ensure it improved customer communication.

Quin said he recognised the fault might have undermined customers' confidence not just in Officemail but in Telecom overall, and he would try and win it back.

The problems last week were triggered by a third-party mailing house sending out a large volume of seasonal promotional material, overloading Officemail's servers.

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- The Dominion Post

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