Facebook rolls out 'pages only' news feed

CHRIS TAYLOR
Last updated 12:02 15/11/2012
Facebook

Brands have to pay just to promote their posts to the people who 'like' their page.

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This post was originally published on Mashable.

Facebook may have unceremoniously deleted an old version of the News Feed, one that showed a wider variety of posts than the current versions, earlier this week. But that doesn't mean the social network has stopped tinkering with this, the most essential of Facebook components.

Rolling out slowly to all users, starting Wednesday morning in the US, an update means you'll be able to view your Facebook feed in a new "Pages Only" mode. The new option reduces your news to updates only from the Pages you've Liked - good news, in short, for businesses, consumer brands, sports teams, media and politicians (though it may have come too late to help Mitt Romney's Page).

As soon as you have it, you'll see a "Pages feed" option on the left hand side of your homepage.

Pages Only arrives just as some companies are getting increasingly frustrated at the News Feed. Dallas Mavericks owner Mark Cuban, for example, said Tuesday that he was considering moving the Mavericks presence off Facebook altogether and onto Tumblr.

Cuban tweeted his frustration at the fact that Facebook put a US$3000 recommended price tag on "promoting" Mavericks posts to a level where it would reach more than a million of the teams' fans.

"FB is blowing it?" Cuban asked on Twitter. No word yet on whether Pages Only will mollify his concerns. But talking to folks inside Facebook, it certainly seems intended to address these kinds of user complaints.

Mashable is the largest independent news source covering digital culture, social media and technology.

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