No confirmation Google destroyed Kiwi data

Last updated 15:34 16/11/2012

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The Privacy Commission is still waiting to get confirmation from Google that it has destroyed a disk which may contain private information about New Zealanders.

It has been nearly six weeks since the commission learnt that Google had not destroyed all of the data it had illegally captured when taking photos of New Zealand streets in 2008.

Some internet users' private information was accessed when Google captured data from unsecured wifi networks during its Street View filming.

Google told Government officials in July that it still had payload information from wifi networks, despite saying months earlier that all information had been destroyed and it had been verified by an independent agency.

In October it told the Office of the Privacy Commissioner that it had one disk which may contain information originated from its Street View filming on New Zealand and Australian roads.

The commissioner's office ordered Google to destroy the disk, but is still waiting on confirmation that it has done so. 

The commission was continuing to follow up with Google to get confirmation that the disk had been destroyed, a spokeswoman said. 

The commission also expected independent verification that it had been destroyed. 

Google could not be reached for comment.

News of Google's privacy breach first surfaced in New Zealand in May 2010.

The Privacy Commissioner investigated and said in December that year Google had breached NZ privacy laws.

It was ordered to destroy the payload information and Google and an independent third-party verified in March, 2011, that it had.

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- Stuff


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