Digital rights groups blast Dutch plan

Last updated 09:00 05/12/2012

Relevant offers

Digital Living

Kiwis still clinging on to old tech Festival-goers use app to locate man with 100 stolen cellphones Netflix on the verge of hitting 100 million subscribers What you're agreeing to when you accept your smart TV's privacy policy Tickle Me Elmo without fur is downright creepy Facebook targets 30,000 fake French accounts before election 'Biggest hack in YouTube history' as accounts compromised by online group Matt Rilkoff: The digital divide between them and us The end is looming for Toshiba Constance Hall: when social media is the third person in your relationship breakdown

Digital rights groups have called on the Dutch justice minister to retract a proposal that would give the country's police the right to break into computers, including foreign citizens' computers, to combat cybercrime.

Minister Ivo Opstelten says investigators have the right to install Internet taps with court permission, citing the need to fight online pedophiles. That sometimes requires breaking into computers.

But a coalition of rights groups - including the Electronic Frontier Foundation and the Netherlands' Bits of Freedom - say other countries will likely follow suit and then attempt to enforce their own laws abroad.

The coalition said "these local laws would not solely address cybercrime, but also issues deemed illegal in other countries, such as blasphemy and political criticism."

The Dutch parliament debates the proposal this week.

Ad Feedback

- AP

Comments

Special offers

Featured Promotions

Sponsored Content