Greens co-leader tables tweet

ANDREA VANCE
Last updated 18:34 05/12/2012
Greens co-leader Russel Norman at the Greens' gathering on Karangahape Road in Auckland last night.
LAWRENCE SMITH/Fairfax NZ
Greens co-leader Russel Norman.

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Green Party co-leader Russel Norman appears to have made parliamentary history by tabling a tweet.

Norman used Parliament's question time to quiz Prime Minister John Key about the Government's decision not to sign up to the second period of Kyoto commitments.  

He says European countries are viewing New Zealand with ''distaste" at international climate talks in Doha and delegates are discussing excluding it from international carbon markets because of the move.

He drew attention to a remark by executive secretary of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change Christiana Figueres. On November 9, she wrote on social networking site Twitter: "Very disappointed that New Zealand will not enter #Kyoto2."

Norman sought leave to table the statement - but did not specifically state that it was a tweet.

Climate Change Minister Tim Groser is due to deliver a speech at Doha later today.

Key said: "The argument that somehow New Zealand is freeloading is a joke. New Zealand is part of the Global Research Alliance, which is delivering international science and research that will reduce methane and nitrate emissions. They represent half of all of New Zealand's emissions."

MPs are allowed to seek leave to "table" or "present" documents when Parliament is sitting, usually to emphasise a point or verify facts. It is up to other MPs if they grant leave - one MP can prevent it.

The Kyoto Protocol is an agreement with binding obligations to cut emissions - the first commitment period ends this year.  Thirty six countries, including Australia, have agreed to sign up to the second round.

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