Silverstripe gets thumbs up

TOM PULLAR-STRECKER
Last updated 10:23 08/02/2013

Relevant offers

Digital Living

New scam reports 'timely reminder' to be vigilant There's a powerful new way to dig up dead websites Australian man turns off Telstra's 2G network, says goodbye to his 13-year-old Nokia GoPro cutting 15% of staff and closing entertainment unit Reddit boss admits to editing users' posts amid pro-Trump troll attacks My experience with UFB How social media has changed the way we eat Explained: HDR photography Battery breakthrough could let phones charge in seconds and last for a week UK law allows govt to track users' internet use

The Government expects to save at least $500,000 a year after giving bureaucrats a "strong steer" to build websites using free open source software developed by Wellington company Silverstripe.

Internal Affairs Minister Chris Tremain said 10 to 15 government websites were built or redesigned each year and the decision to select Silverstripe as the Government's "common web platform" should save about $50,000 a project.

Silverstripe beat about a dozen rivals to secure the deal. Co-founder Sam Minnee said it could provide a significant boost for the 50-person firm.

But the nature of open source software meant it was "not a closed shop" - any web developers using its software to do paid government work could benefit from the contract, not just Silverstripe.

Internal Affairs estimates government agencies spend at least $40 million a year on more than 600 websites. Fairfax NZ

Ad Feedback

- Stuff

Comments

Special offers

Featured Promotions

Sponsored Content