Silverstripe gets thumbs up

TOM PULLAR-STRECKER
Last updated 10:23 08/02/2013

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The Government expects to save at least $500,000 a year after giving bureaucrats a "strong steer" to build websites using free open source software developed by Wellington company Silverstripe.

Internal Affairs Minister Chris Tremain said 10 to 15 government websites were built or redesigned each year and the decision to select Silverstripe as the Government's "common web platform" should save about $50,000 a project.

Silverstripe beat about a dozen rivals to secure the deal. Co-founder Sam Minnee said it could provide a significant boost for the 50-person firm.

But the nature of open source software meant it was "not a closed shop" - any web developers using its software to do paid government work could benefit from the contract, not just Silverstripe.

Internal Affairs estimates government agencies spend at least $40 million a year on more than 600 websites. Fairfax NZ

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