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Telecom: Ultrafast broadband is here

TOM PULLAR-STRECKER
Last updated 12:52 27/03/2013

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Ultrafast broadband will be available from Telecom from tomorrow priced from $95 a month.

The consumer service will offer a 30 megabit-per-second download speed, 10Mbps uplink and a 50-gigabyte monthly data cap.

Telecom will offer the same service with a 150Gb datacap for $109 a month and with 500Gb for $129.

Initially, the data caps will not be enforced and all customers will be charged $95.

The prices include landline rental, installation and a modem and all other equipment required for the connection.

A faster service, with 100Mbps download speeds and a 50Mbps uplink, will cost an extra $30 a month on top of those prices.

All the plans have a minimum one-year contract term.

Some smaller internet providers, including Orcon, Slingshot and Snap, began retailing UFB to consumers last year.

Vodafone, which also owns TelstraClear, has yet to say when it will join them in selling services delivered over the government-backed network.

Telecom already retails fibre-based broadband to businesses and schools, and updated those plans today.

Retail head Chris Quin said Telecom had decided to keep its plans "simple and competitively priced".

The plans will initially be available in areas where Chorus has the contract to lay the UFB network, with Christchurch, the central North Island and Whangarei to follow.

The UFB network is not due to be completed until 2020, meaning only a few customers will be able to buy the plans immediately.

Quin said UFB had benefits in speed and reduced latency, and trials had shown customers who bought the plans would consume more data than those on copper-based broadband.

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- © Fairfax NZ News

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