Social skulkers get online platform

ANDY GOLDBERG
Last updated 07:00 05/07/2013
Potluck Social Network

POTLUCK: New social network's focus on shared interests instead of self-promotion.

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A new social network aims to draw in the almost 90 per cent of users who peruse content on sites like Facebook but are too shy to actually post anything.

Potluck, launched to the public in June, comes from a start-up funded by the founders of Twitter and aims to take the stigma out of communicating with strangers online by focusing on the posting of links without names or avatars.

According to the Potluck creators, this will relieve the anxiety felt by many people about posting on regular social networks where "you're under constant pressure to live up to expectations: double-digit likes, original witticisms, breathtaking images".

According to Potluck, 86 per cent of web users suffer anxiety about posting content. The company refers to these individuals as "lurkers" as opposed to active posters, and believes the simple format of posting links and talking about them will draw them out of their social shell.

Users will be able to see their friends' links and the links their friends are talking about - triggering the kind of conversations with friends of friends that Potluck claims are becoming all too rare among users of Facebook and Twitter.

"You'll often find yourself seeing new faces, talking to people you don't know yet, and stumbling across topics you wouldn't have thought to look for," Potluck said.

"These interactions couldn't happen in other places online, where talking to friends of friends is creepy and browsing content that isn't perfectly tailored to you is a drag."

-DPA

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