Train windows send ads directly to your head

Last updated 05:00 07/07/2013

YOU ARE NOT DREAMING: Lean on for messages broadcast directly into your head.

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This post& was originally published on Mashable.

Billboards. Radio ads. Pop-up banners. You see and hear advertising everywhere, but a new concept literally bring ads into your skull.

Sleepy commuters in Germany who rest their heads on train windows recently got a surprise when they heard an ad that no one else could. They weren't dreaming: a transmitter attached to windows of trains in Munich and North Rhine-Westphalia was sending high-frequency vibrations to the windowpane, so voices could be heard through bone conduction.

The ad campaign by agency BBDO in Dusseldorf, Germany, was launched with prototypes on behalf of broadcasting company Sky Deutschland in January. Now the agency plans to roll it out nationwide in Germany. It advertises Sky's new mobile app.

"Passengers got surprised and enjoyed this new form of advertising," BBDO Germany told Mashable. "Highly encouraging first reactions by commuters and our client." Now the agency plans to roll out this type of advertising nationwide in Germany.

BBDO said the technology could be used beyond advertising to include music, entertainment, transport information and weather. The same sound transmission technology has been used in some headphones, hearing aids and is one of the main features of Google Glass.

While marketers might like this pervasive advertising medium, we wonder whether commuters would get annoyed when they're just trying to rest. After all, sleep is one of our few escapes from the constant bombardment of screens, notifications and ad messages.

What do you think about this approach to promotion? Are the window ads innovative or too pervasive? Share your thoughts in the comments.

Thumbnail image courtesy of YouTube, noris100.

Mashable is the largest independent news source covering digital culture, social media and technology.

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