Review: The Witcher (PC)

Point-and-click combat a bore

Last updated 16:54 25/01/2008
Based on fantasy novels of Polish novelist Andrzej Sapkowski

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The Witcher comes from first-time development house CD Projekt, and tells the tale of a sort of demon hunter for hire, Geralt.

Apparently using content based on the fantasy novels of Polish novelist Andrzej Sapkowski, The Witcher also features gruff heroic men with big swords and ample-breasted maidens who also help out in the fighting. Then there are the scary creatures pumped full of magic that you have to slay and the bad guys out to get you.

It all sounds like a rollicking good time, but to be honest it's generic characters and repetitive point-and-click combat just didn't grab me at all.

Combat differs slightly from the click-the-enemy-until-they-fall over type - but not much.

The first click sees Geralt make his first attack. When the cursor changes to a flaming sword: that's when you click again, initiating another attacking move.

If you can do this successfully, you can link attacks and quickly defeat the enemy.

Mistime your clicks, though, and you'll disrupt the chain attacks, and it'll turn into, er, just clicking until the enemy dies.

Geralt has three main fighting styles: fast, strong and group, and you can switch between them, depending on the types of enemies you are facing.

It's a good idea, but having to switch between fighting styles mid-battle - you can even pause the battle to change styles - makes combat a little disjointed.

Geralt can use alchemy and magic to defeat enemies and collect goods and equipment, and the game promises 80 hours of game-play.

I haven't played it for that long, so I can't vouch for that claim.

The Witcher isn't the most cutting-edge game visually, but at times it presents some nice cinematic in-game movies, but the voice acting ranges from merely adequate to downright corny.

In the end though, The Witcher just didn't grab me by the ears or rock my socks off.

Hardcore role-playing game fans might find something here to tickle their fancy, but its generic characters and at times mind-numbing combat did nothing for me.

 

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