US lawmaker wants tax on violent games

Last updated 10:46 16/01/2013
Assassin's Creed III
WITHOUT REPRESENTATION: A Republican lawmaker has proposed a tax on video games to fund mental health programmes.

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A Republican lawmaker from rural Missouri is calling for a sales tax on violent video games in response to a deadly Connecticut school shooting.

Representative Diane Franklin, of Camdenton, said on Tuesday that the 1 per cent sales tax would finance mental health programmes and law enforcement measures to prevent mass shootings.

Franklin's proposal is the latest in a string of measures proposed nationwide in response to the Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting that killed 20 students and six adults.

It is likely to be a tough sell, however. Republican legislative leaders and Democratic Governor Jay Nixon both have taken stands against tax increases.

Similar legislation to tax violent video games failed in Oklahoma and New Mexico in recent years.

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- AP

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