From Donkey Kong to power list

SCOTT DOUGHERTY
Last updated 13:04 20/02/2013
Siobhan Reddy
TOTAL SURPRISE: Sydney game developer Siobhan Reddy is now one of the top 100 most powerful women in Britain.

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She grew up playing Donkey Kong in the back of her parents' car on long drives from her Campbelltown home, but now Siobhan Reddy sits alongside the Queen, JK Rowling, Adele and Victoria Beckham in the top 100 most powerful women in Britain.

Reddy, now 33, left her parents Ruse home at 18 to follow her dreams of developing computer games.

She said she had "no idea what I was doing" when she made the move.

But after winning a production award at the first ever Microsoft Women in Gaming Awards in 2009 and now judged by BBC to be one of 100 women to have the greatest impact on British politics, society, culture and the economy, it's fair to say the move paid off.

"It was a total surprise and I feel very honoured to be in such amazing company," Ms Reddy told Fairfax Media from London.

"It's really great that video games were represented on this list and so I am really happy about that."

She co-founded UK development studio Media Molecule - the developers responsible for the multi award-winning game Little Big Planet.

She got her first computer games job at Spike Wireless before relocating to England where she began work as a production assistant with Perfect Entertainment.

She then moved to Criterion Games, leaving to start Media Molecule in 2006 where her role now is split between studio direction and games production.

Louisa Tobin, a primary school teacher of Reddy at St Thomas More Catholic Parish Primary School in Ruse said she "looked outside the square" even in primary school.

Reddy said it was at her high school, Macarthur Anglican, where she fell in love with technology and art.

"I learnt a lot about selling shoes in Campbelltown!" she said.

"But I made a lot of different friends, lots of people in my youth were really into music and art.

"I was really lucky that Murray Benn, a teacher at Macarthur Anglican, took a real interest in the fact a few of us wanted to explore filmmaking and technology.

"He was a real enabler, and wasn't even my teacher. I am always grateful for that."

One of five children, she comes back to Campbelltown once a year to visit her parents Chris and Yvonne.

"We're so proud of her," said Yvonne.

"We were overwhelmed to hear of this latest accolade but she is so humble."

Reddy said she misses her hometown's people and eating the chips from local takeaway shop Sydney Fried Chicken with her sister.

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Read the full list here.

- FFX Aus

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