Nadine Chalmers-Ross: His online life is like a drug dealer's – but his mother will sort him out

New reesearch suggests would-be recruiters don't care about your adventures on social media, but is it worth the risk?
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New reesearch suggests would-be recruiters don't care about your adventures on social media, but is it worth the risk?

OPINION: There's a guy I know, I won't call him a friend, but this guy I know runs what's become a rather notorious, but wildly popular Snapchat account.

It more closely resembles a drug lord's Redtube account than a catalogue of his adventures. He seems to feel safe in the knowledge his posts of snorting substances off women's body parts and filming girls who don't appear to want to be filmed will disappear after 24 hours. But everywhere I go I hear people discussing their astonishment at what he manages to get away with posting.

His antics are vile, but have so far failed to get him into trouble. I'm hoping his luck will soon run out.

Nadine Chalmers-Ross: It's easy to be staunch about your rights, in theory, but not so when faced with the prospect of ...
CHRIS McKEEN / FAIRFAX NZ

Nadine Chalmers-Ross: It's easy to be staunch about your rights, in theory, but not so when faced with the prospect of losing your job.

But perhaps I'll be disappointed, because I read this week that you can now happily post your questionable antics without fear of it hurting your job prospects.

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Recruiters pay little attention to your social media exploits, according to new research, instead relying on your carefully curated CV and well-rehearsed answers in your job interview.

I'm dubious that's true, because stories abound of how workers have tweeted or "snapped" themselves a spot in the dole queue.

If you bite the hand that feeds your family each payday by bagging your employer on the world wide web, that cheque might soon cease.  Plus if you pull a sickie and then post a party selfie you probably deserve to get the sack.

And some companies take their social media policies a step further. One NZ company I know of stipulates in some contracts that it "owns" your social media. A bank in Australia tried to tell employees they could be punished if they didn't report bad things being said online about the company. The rule at TVNZ used to be you must not post pictures in your bikini, I could never work out why.

Those measures start to get me a bit uncomfortable, your boss doesn't own you or your thoughts 24 hours a day. Provided you're not employed by Kim Jong Un and you're not bagging the company or breaking the law, you should be able to post what you like online without fear of reprisal.

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It's easy to be staunch about your rights, in theory, but not so when faced with the prospect of losing your job. If you're posting party pics five nights a week your boss would be right to question how tired you are on the job.  If your profile pic is a selfie with your stolen road cones you probably have a limited tenure as a stop-go man.

Forget what the recruiters say, I'd be Facebook stalking up the wazoo before offering someone a contract.

I've toyed with the idea of calling the Snapchat fiend's new boss. But I've decided instead to call his Mum, because I think that might actually be worse.

 - Sunday Star Times

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