Implosion likely for police station

GEORGINA STYLIANOU
Last updated 05:00 05/07/2014

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Christchurch's former police station may be brought down with explosives.

Ngai Tahu Property (NTP) confirmed the former Christchurch central police station on Hereford St could be demolished by implosion.

The 13-storey tower was damaged in the earthquakes and police staff moved out of the central site in late 2012.

NTP chief executive Tony Sewell said implosion and traditional demolition were the two options being considered.

"We're currently in discussions with both the Christchurch City Council and the [Canterbury Earthquake Recovery Authority]," he said.

Ceres New Zealand manager Bernie de Vere said the company was working with Ngai Tahu.

The company was contracted to assist with Radio Network House - the first controlled building demolition by explosives in New Zealand in August 2012.

De Vere said with all demolitions there was a "set process" that had to be worked through, which included traffic management plans, health and safety and confirmation of time frames.

"At this stage we are in the very early stages of consulting with the owners and therefore are unable to make comment about the potential demolition of the [former] police station," he said.

Hundreds of people crowded into Latimer Sq to watch the 14-storey Radio Network building come down. The implosion went without incident.

Ceres partnered with Controlled Demolition Inc, an American company with a track record of more than 9000 implosions.

NTP owns the block bordered by Montreal, Hereford and Cashel streets and Cambridge Tce - an area of about 15,500 square metres.

Sewell said it was too early to comment on development plans.

The former police station was built in the early 1970s and was the sixth tallest building in Christchurch at the time.

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- The Press

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