Christchurch City Council wants more good-looking fences and billboards

Armitage Williams Construction, that is building the PwC Centre on the corner of Cambridge Tce and Cashel St, has used ...
DEAN KOZANIC/FAIRFAX NZ

Armitage Williams Construction, that is building the PwC Centre on the corner of Cambridge Tce and Cashel St, has used graphic design to smarten up its construction hoarding.

A scheme to brighten up Christchurch's construction sites will likely be extended, despite poor uptake of a city council rebate programme.  

In 2014, the Christchurch City Council decided to offer a fee rebate to construction companies that added some flair to their site fencing, in a bid to make the central city more aesthetically pleasing. 

The council estimates about 11 kilometres of fencing and hoarding is in the central city. 

Ara Institute of Canterbury has used artwork from students to brighten up its Moorhouse Ave construction site.
DEAN KOZANIC/FAIRFAX NZ

Ara Institute of Canterbury has used artwork from students to brighten up its Moorhouse Ave construction site.

So far only Ara Institute and Armitage Williams Construction have taken up the challenge. 

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The council's infrastructure, transport and environment committee on Thursday recommended the council extend the programme, simplify the design guidelines and promote it more. 

Developers and construction companies whose hoardings or fences encroach on public footpaths or roads are charged $15 a month per square metre, but the policy allows for a discount of up to 50 per cent if the hoardings include art work or other interesting features.

The council expects to collect about $500,000 from companies paying the fees this year. 

Head of transport Chris Gregory said the council needed to "remove some of the barriers" to receiving the rebate and make some pre-designed art work available to applicants. 

The aim was to "normalise good design" in construction hoardings, following in the footsteps of cities like Sydney.

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"We think [it should be extended] given development is likely to continue for a number of years and there's a good intention behind it," he said.

The scheme is due to expire on June 30.

A council report said uptake of the programme had been poor. 

"Two hoardings have been produced with a few others about to be delivered.

"The impact of hoardings has not decreased . . . the increased pace of development has led to a greater number of solid hoardings versus chain link fencing."

The council will decide whether to extend the programme for two more years later this month.

 - Stuff

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