Young designer committed to ChCh

GEORGINA STYLIANOU
Last updated 12:15 27/12/2012
Will King
David Hallett

EXCITING INDUSTRY: Will King is "pretty positive" about Christchurch's future.

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The Rebuild

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While some young people fled Christchurch after the earthquakes, many talented and determined people have decided to stay and help shape their city's future. In this Stepping Up series, The Press will profile 12 under-30s making a difference. GEORGINA STYLIANOU reports.

Former design student Will King says he wants to be part of the Christchurch rebuild.

The Design and Arts School in Christchurch suffered damage in the February 2011 earthquake and made for an "interesting last few months" of King's degree.

"I started looking for work and ended up getting a job with Fletcher Reinforcing working as a contracts supervisor," he said.

His favourite aspect of the job was involvement with the bigger projects.

He has worked on the new St Martins New World supermarket, the cardboard cathedral and, most recently, the St Elmo Courts development.

"It can be really stressful at times," he said.

"In the last few months we've seen a huge increase in workload because the rebuild is starting to kick off now."

King said he enjoyed feeling like he was making a contribution, and seeing "creative and innovative new ways of doing things".

He hoped to work his way into project manager roles.

"I never thought this is what I would be doing, but it's great. I always intended to work for an architect, but the construction industry is a pretty exciting place to be right now."

King has enjoyed seeing life slowly returning to normal, but admitted the road ahead was a long one.

This year he also started his own company, King Watercraft Design, a venture that "keeps him sane".

He often works until midnight completing boat design projects after a long day at the office.

"But you do it because you love it and I'm pretty positive about Christchurch. There will be some obstacles, but that's OK."

The earthquakes had given him the opportunity to meet some great people, make some great contacts and learn a lot.

He said some young people had overlooked the opportunities created in Christchurch but he was hopeful they would return as the rebuild progressed.

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