Scot proud to create a legacy for new home

LOIS CAIRNS
Last updated 05:00 08/01/2013
Project manager Michael Cherry
DAVID HALLETT/Fairfax NZ
RESTORING LIVES: Project manager Michael Cherry thinks it will take a decade to rebuild Christchurch but says it will be well worth the wait.

Relevant offers

The Rebuild

Desperate woman in EQC limbo Scirt go dancing in the streets $50m complex at McKenzie and Willis site Commissioner Rennie apologises for Sutton press conference Church 'taking time to reflect' EQC slated after asbestos inquiry Asbestos risk 'very low' in quake repairs: Worksafe Christchurch stadium build pushed back to 2025 High-end apartments ready to take shape Forsyth Barr building to become Crowne Plaza Hotel

Across Christchurch, thousands of people are working hard to piece our city back together. In the second of a six-part series, The Press meets a Scotsman toiling away on the rebuild.

Michael Cherry is among the foreign workers helping to put Christchurch back together.

The 29-year-old from Scotland works as a project manager for Fulton Hogan and has spent the past few months overseeing the rebuild of a publicly owned retaining wall along Lyttelton's Sumner Rd.

The job is not without its frustrations - problems in obtaining easement agreements so that ground anchors can be positioned under private properties have caused repeated delays to the project - but Cherry is proud to be doing his bit to help Christchurch back to its feet.

"It feels good to help with the rebuild, to help people get their lives back together," he said.

Cherry, his wife and 7-year-old daughter arrived in Christchurch from Scotland 14 months ago. They had planned to come earlier but put off moving for a few months because of the earthquakes. The family are glad they pushed ahead with the move and say they want to make Christchurch their long-term home.

Cherry believes it will take another 10 years to get the city rebuilt but he is confident Christchurch will again be a great place to live and raise a family.

He is looking forward to telling his daughter about the role he played in the rebuild.

"It's nice to have a legacy, to know you played a part. I'm looking forward to being able to drive around the city in 10 years' time and being able to say, ‘Yep, I helped build that and that'."

Cherry said the best part of his job was "getting to build stuff" that would make a real difference to people's lives.

"It's fantastic to be able to stand back and look at what you've built and know it's going to help people put their lives back together," he said.

"We're building infrastructure that will allow people to get their houses repaired and to get on with their lives."

Ad Feedback

- The Press

Comments

Special offers
Opinion poll

Is it worth spending extra to repair heritage buildings?

Yes, Christchurch needs to invest in its heritage buildings

No, we should embrace modern design if it is cheaper and quicker

Only some heritage buildings are worth the money

Vote Result

Related story: Landmark church nearly $1m short

Featured Promotions

Sponsored Content