Still waiting for decision after 15 weeks

Last updated 05:00 23/07/2014
Elizabeth Moore
FEELING DRAINED: Elizabeth Moore at her Fendalton home, which will be rebuilt once consents are granted.

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Elizabeth Moore is starting to give up hope her building consent will ever get approved.

She has been waiting 15 weeks for the Christchurch City Council to issue a building consent for her new Fendalton home.

"As the weeks go by, I've almost got to the point where I'm thinking it's never going to happen."

If the consent is not issued soon, her builder will be forced to take on another job, which could delay her build by six months.

The city council this week said its consenting performance had improved and it was on track to regain building-consent accreditation after it was stripped in July last year.

In June, the council granted 87 per cent of residential consents in the required 20 days, up from 65 per cent in February.

However, Moore and several other people who contacted The Press yesterday believe the council still has a long way to go.

Given the council's consenting issues, Moore hoped approval would come through in seven weeks, but never thought she would still be waiting 15 weeks later.

She would have appreciated a progress update from the council but had heard nothing.

Her existing home, where she is living with her husband and son, has floor heights that differ by 20 centimetres and there are 6cm cracks in the wall, making the house hard to heat. The home will be demolished and the new one built on the existing footprint.

"Sometimes it really does get you down living in a house like this. I know life is more than the house you live in but it should be a refuge."

Council director of building control and city rebuild Peter Sparrow said one of the council's consents staff had been in contact with Moore and vowed to take action to progress the consent.

He said the council had been waiting on information from the owner's architect since June 12.

Moore said the architect had supplied the information weeks ago.

Sparrow said the consent was one of 18 per cent of applications in the system that had extended beyond the 20-day time frame.

"This is in part due to some issues with our processing and the building-consent documentation. Steps have been taken to address the issues with our processes."

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- The Press


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